How Milo Ventimiglia Thinks 'This Is Us' Will Handle Mandy Moore's Pregnancy

Bringing her baby bump to set! Milo Ventimiglia exclusively told Us Weekly about working with pregnant Mandy Moore on This Is Us.

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“I’m sure as she’s evolving in her birth, as her belly is growing, then we’ll probably be playing some of those notes up to the Big Three’s birth,” the actor, 43, said on Tuesday, October 20, referencing Kate, Randall and Kevin Pearson on the NBC show.

The California native added, “As far as I understand it, Mandy’s not really showing right now, but I think … it’s gonna creep up on all of us!”

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Moore, 36, announced last month that she is pregnant with her and husband Taylor Goldsmith’s first child. “Baby Boy Goldsmith coming early 2021,” the actress captioned a September Instagram slideshow.

Later that same month, the New Hampshire native described the food aversions she was experiencing during her pregnancy. “Just sitting here thinking: will I ever enjoy coffee again?” the “When I Wasn’t Watching” singer said on her Instagram Story. “It makes me feel sad because I used to dream about coffee before bed. I am fully expecting that my love of coffee will come back. If not, all good. Small price to pay. The food aversions, though, can we talk about that? Coffee’s not the only one. … I had the worst food aversions, I still can’t think about some things or look at them in the fridge.”

The Princess Diaries star added that she had a “really tough first 15 weeks,” praising her husband’s help.

While Moore films season 5 of This Is Us, she and her fellow cast members are taking precautions amid the coronavirus pandemic.

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Ventimiglia explained to Us on Tuesday: “Mandy and I were inches away on Saturday doing a few scenes together. She’s regularly tested [and] I’m regularly tested because of the seriousness of COVID and knowing that Mandy’s pregnant. We have 150 souls on our crew and nobody wants to put them at risk. I trust Mandy and how she goes about her life away from work, and I think Mandy trusts me for how I go about my life away from work. We’re always mindful of that.”

The Gilmore Girls alum went on to say that fans wouldn’t see “Mandy kissing [a] Jack dummy or Milo kissing [a] Mandy dummy” in future episodes.

With reporting by Emily Longeretta

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Ryan Lochte: When Kayla and I Will Consider Having Baby No. 3

Room for one more? Ryan Lochte dished on when he and his wife, Kayla Rae Reid, will consider expanding their brood further with a third child.

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“I am so happy right now with [what we have]. We wanted a boy and then a girl afterwards, and it worked out in our favor,” the 36-year-old pro swimmer told Us Weekly exclusively on Thursday, October 15, while promoting the Piñata app. “Like, it was just perfect. We had the perfect family right now.”

Lochte continued, “But, I mean, it’s not really up to me [if and when we have more kids]. It’s up to the boss lady. And if she wants more, we’re gonna have more. … But I said, ‘Let’s wait after 2021, the Olympics.’ Then we can start popping out more kids if we want.”

The 12-time Olympic medalist married the 29-year-old model in 2018. They welcomed their son Caiden, 3, in 2017 and daughter Liv, 15 months, in 2019.

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Last year, Lochte spoke to Us exclusively about how much his life has changed since becoming the father of two young children. “Kids have changed everything,” he said at the time. “It’s not just me and her anymore. We have to always wake up and care for our little ones.”

The athlete added, “One was hard, two is very hard, but it’s so much fun knowing every time we see our kids, we created this. … It’s pretty awesome to see them grow into people that they’re going to become.”

One thing that hasn’t changed for Lochte and Reid since becoming parents is the strong foundation they have in their romantic relationship. Speaking to Us on Thursday, he explained that the key to their successful marriage is making sure to “do something nice” for your partner every day.

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“I have little Post-it notes in the cupboard. So, when she opens up to get coffee or something, she sees like, ‘You’re beautiful,’ stuff like that,” he explained. “So, I still do a lot of things like that and just being there all the time as much as I can when I’m not swimming. I mean, she’s, like, my best friend. So, that’s awesome.”

Instead of gearing up to expand his family with Reid, Lochte currently has his sights focused on his new partnership with Piñata alongside pal and Celebrity Big Brother costar Jonathan Bennett. Through the unique app, users are rewarded for paying their rent on time.

“Being an Olympian, I was always traveling [and] going to different places, always on the road. Renting was the best thing that fit my lifestyle at the time,” he told Us. “Then, when I found out about Piñata and the rewards that you can get while paying rent, I was, like, my mind was blown. I was like, ‘What? Are you serious? I can actually get rewards for paying rent?’ This is unheard of. So, I immediately teamed up with them.”

With reporting by Christina Garibaldi

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Millions will need mental health help in the wake of coronavirus, experts warn

We’re on the brink of a major crisis of mental health, a new report warns.

Around 8.5 million adults and 1.5 million children in England will need mental health support in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, predicts new analysis from the Centre For Mental Health, which consulted experts from NHS England and NHS trusts.

They warn that many will have lost jobs, lost loved ones, or will be dealing with the long-term effects of having Covid-19.

Add in the general rise of issues such as health anxiety and agoraphobia due to Covid-19, and it’s clear to see that we’re heading for trouble.

The reports suggests that while two-thirds of people will already have existing mental illness and may be receiving support, others will need help for the first time, creating an even greater strain on mental health care by the NHS.

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That’s without considering the mental impact of coronavirus on NHS staff, who the report suggests will need treatment for issues such as post-traumatic distress, high psychological distress, and burnout.

The report says: ‘Among people who have not experienced mental ill health prior to the pandemic, demand for services is forecast at 1.33 million people for moderate-severe anxiety and 1.82 million for moderate to severe depression.’

From the total number of people needing support, researchers estimate more than 230,000 NHS workers may need treatment, including for post-traumatic distress (36,996), high psychological distress (120,372) and burnout (81,499).

Among patients recovering from severe Covid-19, an estimated 630 will need mental health support for anxiety, 454 for depression and 354 for PTSD, according to the report.

Meanwhile, 36,000 people who lost loved ones will need treatment, with depression being the most common condition.

At present unemployment levels, which could rise, around 30,000 people who lost their job will need support for major depression.

And of the 1.5 million children estimated to need support, 458,922 will need help for depression and 407,623 for anxiety.

Children who have lost parents to Covid-19 will also require help, plus those who suffered other mental distress during lockdown.

Nick O’Shea, the chief economist at the Centre For Mental Health, who led the research, said: ‘The numbers are stark. Covid-19 is a disaster for every country that has been badly affected, and the consequences for our mental health are just as severe.

‘The challenge of meeting the mental health needs arising out of the pandemic may be as great as the many difficulties of responding to the virus.

‘So it must be taken as seriously. We must prepare now for what lies ahead.’

The team behind the report want to prepare us for the looming crisis ahead and make sure that plans are put in place to identify people who need mental health support and ensure they receive the right care quickly.

‘Unresolved mental health needs can escalate to crisis point without effective early help,’ Nick added.

‘We cannot afford to wait and see or to leave it until after the pandemic has subsided.’

Centre For Mental Health chief executive Sarah Hughes said: ‘We have identified the risks and the unequal impacts of Covid-19 on both mental and physical health

‘The extent of the crisis is becoming clearer every day.

‘There is a rising tide of distress that will over time require effective and compassionate care and support.

‘The Government and the NHS must act now. We must not leave the nation’s mental health to chance.’

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For emotional support you can call the Samaritans 24-hour helpline on 116 123, email [email protected], visit a Samaritans branch in person or go to the Samaritans website.

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New test better predicts which babies will develop type 1 diabetes

A new approach to predicting which babies will develop type 1 diabetes moves a step closer to routine testing for newborns which could avoid life-threatening complications.

Scientists at seven international sites have followed 7,798 children at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes from birth, over nine years, in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study. The TEDDY Study is a large international study funded primarily by the US National Institutes of Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control, as well as by the charity JDRF.

In research published in Nature Medicine, scientists at the University of Exeter and the Pacific Northwest Research Institute in Seattle used the TEDDY data to develop a method of combining multiple factors that could influence whether a child is likely to develop type 1 diabetes. The combined risk score approach incorporates genetics, clinical factors such as family history of diabetes, and their count of islet autoantibodies—biomarkers known to be implicated in type 1 diabetes.

The research team found that the new combined approach dramatically improved prediction of which children would develop type 1 diabetes, potentially allowing better diabetes risk counseling of families. Most importantly, the new approach doubled the efficiency of programs to screen newborns to prevent the potentially deadly condition of ketoacidosis, a consequence of type 1 diabetes in which insulin deficiency causes the blood to become too acidic. Identifying which children are at highest risk will also benefit clinical trials on drugs that are showing promise in preventing the condition.

Dr. Lauric Ferrat at the University of Exeter Medical School, said: “At the moment, 40 per cent of children who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have the severe complication of ketoacidosis. For the very young this is life-threatening, resulting in long intensive hospitalizations and in some cases even paralysis or death. Using our new combined approach to identify which babies will develop diabetes can prevent these tragedies, and ensure children are on the right treatment pathway earlier in life, meaning better health.”

Professor William Hagopian of the Pacific Northwest Research Institute, said: “We’re really excited by these findings. They suggest that the routine heel prick testing of babies done at birth, could go a long way towards preventing early sickness as well as predicting which children will get type 1 diabetes years later. We’re now putting this to the test in a trial in Washington State. We hope it will ultimately be used internationally to identify the condition as early as possible, and to power efforts to prevent the disease.”

Researchers believe the combined approach can also be rolled out to predict the onset of other diseases with a strong genetic component that are identifiable in childhood, such as celiac disease.

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Sean Lowe Doesn't Want 'More Than 4 Kids,' but Catherine Giudici Will Decide

The more, the merrier! Sean Lowe and his wife, Catherine Giudici, aren’t done expanding their family after welcoming their third child.

“We’ve talked about adopting a fourth child,” the former Bachelor, 36, recently told Us Weekly while promoting his Gillette partnership. “I don’t know if we’re done having biological children. I kind of hope that we are, because I think if we do end up adopting … that’d be a lot of kids.”

Since the Texas native doesn’t “want more than four” children, their future family plans are “still up in the air.”

The Bachelorette alum, who shares Samuel, 3, Isaiah, 2, and Mia, 5 months, with the Washington native, 34, went on to tell Us, “I imagine Catherine will make the ultimate decision, as I will have to defer to her. … At some point, I would like to get out of diapers, so that would be nice.”

Giudici gave birth to their daughter in December 2019, and her older bothers have had “a really easy adjustment.” Lowe explained, “The only thing that they get in trouble for is they love on her too much. Man, they just constantly want to give her kisses so sometimes I just have to tell them, ‘Guys, you’ve got to give her some air. She cannot breathe. You have to stop kissing her for a minute.’”

The little one is “a super happy baby,” the For the Right Reasons author told Us. “She just smiles and laughs all the time.”

When it comes to Mia’s latest milestones, she’s eating baby food, sitting up with assistance and becoming more aware of her surroundings.

“It’s fun to realize what she’s learning at a young age, and then to think about how she’s going to continue to transform into this little kid over the next six or 12 months or so,” Lowe gushed.

He and Giudici tied the knot in 2014 in California after meeting and falling in love on season 17 of The Bachelor.

Lowe has been working with Gillette to encourage dads to show off clean-shaven faces on social media with the hashtag #BabyFace as a commitment to develop strong bonds with their babies.

With reporting by Sarah Hearon

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These Baby High Chairs Will Give Them the Safe Boost They Need

Aside from diapers and baby formula, the other constant in your life as a parent of a baby is going to be a reliable baby high chair. Whether you’re eating at home, at a relative’s, or at a restaurant, you’re going to need something to give them a boost while keeping them safely contained so you can eat too. The best baby high chairs come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors that you can match to their favorite outfits or colors. Many high chairs come with different features, so it’s important to consider what’s the best option for you and your little one.

When you’re picking out a baby high chair, you’ll first want to determine where you’re going to use it most. If you’re looking for a travel-friendly version, you’ll want a compact one that’s easy to fit in the car. To avoid buying high chairs as they grow out of them, one that easily adjusts as they grow up is a must. Some high chairs even convert into a step stool, so that’s another smart thing to consider. Ahead, we’ve rounded up the best baby high chairs to meet your needs.

1. Infantino High Chair

They (and you) won’t be able to resist this darling fox baby high chair. This four-in-one baby high chair is also smart too by saving space in your home. It converts from a booster into a toddler chair with ease so it will grow with them as they outgrow their baby high chair. It’s also easy to clean and has an easy release food tray for fuss-free cleaning. You can wipe down the soft cushioning without a problem, too. With front wheels, you can reposition the chair to face however you’d like.

2. Graco Everystep High Chair

If you want a baby high chair that does more than let your little one safely sit, then this convertible option will meet your needs. This smart high chair easily converts from a high chair to a kids step stool for when they need to reach for the counter. With seven total growing stages, you can keep this high chair for years without having to replace it as they get bigger. It’s narrowed down to three stages: the infant high chair with three reclining positions, fully featured baby high chair with seven height positions and dishwasher-safe tray insert, and infant booster seat that brings them right up to the table by attaching to the table.

3. Fisher Price SpaceSaver High Chair

Whether you have tight quarters at home or travel often with baby, this compact baby high chair is going to save a ton of valuable space wherever you go. Not to mention, it has a stylish neutral design that will look great in your home. It may be smaller, but it still packs in all the features of a full size high chair. It even transforms from an infant booster to a toddler one too, so you don’t have to purchase a new one as they get older. There’s two height adjustments and three recline positions for ultimate comfort, and the machine-washable seat pad makes clean ups a breeze. The deep-dish tray prevents food from falling over the edge, too.


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These Children's Books Featuring Adopted/Foster Kids Will Make You Cry

Foster care adoptions reached a record high in 2020 — so why aren’t more kids and parents talking about fostering, or adoption in general, as a key process that has led to so many families being built? Of course, raising these topics with your kids isn’t easy; our words and even our tone can shape adopted and foster kids’ experiences and have a lasting impact on their mental and emotional health. But there are some amazing children’s books featuring adopted or foster kids that can help — teaching both kids and adults how to have thoughtful conversations about adoption and foster homes, and tackling subjects like grief, sadness, confusion, adaptation, and love.

That’s why we’ve gathered some of the most beautiful books out there that are suitable for young children and teens and which center on adoption and foster care. These are beautiful, relatable stories guaranteed to open up discussions and let kids know that they’re not alone in their feelings or experiences.

The Story of My Open Adoption

This heartwarming story, from solo mom by choice (and SheKnows writer!) Leah Campbell, is about Sammy Squirrel who is adopted at birth by the bunny family. A perfect option for teaching kids about the ever-more common open adoption process.

I’ve Loved You Since Forever

We love a lot of things about Hoda Kotb, and her children’s book about adoption is pretty high on the list. Kotb has two adopted daughters, Hope and Haley, whom we just know she has loved since forever. Although Kotb penned this book in response to adopting her eldest daughter, its themes of enduring love apply to any family, adopted or otherwise.

Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born

Many children have questions about their birth, but what happens when a child’s parents weren’t there to recount all of the details? Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born, written by Jamie Lee Curtis and illustrated by Laura Cornell, tells the story of one young girl who loves to hear about the night her parents brought her into their family. This sweet book acknowledges that adopted children have an array of different stories and reminds readers that their births — and all of the moments since — are valuable and cherished by their families.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries

The adoption and foster care processes can be stressful for children who don’t always understand why their situations are changing. Sadly, these experiences can lead to increased risk for poorer physical and mental health in the long run, including depression and anxiety, according to a study commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Too often, these children will internalize their feelings as they may not believe they can confide in a trusted adult.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries, written by Jill Seeney and illustrated by Rachel Fuller, tells the story of Morris the Mole who hides his worries from his loved ones. Throughout the book, Morris’ friends help him to understand that they care about his feelings and want to help him face his problems. With their assistance, Morris learns that while it’s normal to feel worried sometimes, he doesn’t have to experience any of his emotions alone.

Elliot

Placing a child into adoptive or foster care can be a complex and emotionally wrought decision for parents. Often, it can be just as confusing and challenging for children, who don’t understand why their lives are changing or why their parents may not be equipped to provide them with the care they need.

Elliot, written by adoptive mother Julie Pearson and illustrated by Manon Gauthier, is the story about a young rabbit whose parents believe another family could better care for him. Throughout the story, a social worker named Thomas helps Elliot navigate the foster care system in hopes of finding a family who can love and care for Elliot the way he deserves.

While the book has received a lot of positive recognition, some readers have said they felt the book seemed to place blame on Elliot for his changing circumstances because he cries and has outbursts. If you want to read this book with kids, you might want to explain that there’s nothing wrong with Elliot, or any other children in adoptive or foster care, and they are all worthy of love.

Maybe Days: A Book for Children in Foster Care

Maybe Days is a fantastic resource for children who have questions about why they are in foster care and how the process works. Author Jennifer Wilgocki breaks down what kids can expect from their parents, social workers, foster families, and more in ways they can easily digest, while illustrator Alissa Imre Geis’ drawings help younger children visualize various scenarios. The book, published by the American Psychological Association, also helps children get in touch with and better understand their feelings.

Picnic in the Park

No two families are the same, and that’s a reason to celebrate! Picnic in the Park introduces kids to different family dynamics — including families with LGBTQ parents, single parents, adoptive parents, and foster parents — so that they can grasp the beauty and importance of diversity at a young age. Together, author Joe Griffiths and illustrator Tony Pilgrim highlight that while families vary, the one thing they often share in common is love.

And Tango Makes Three

This delightful book from authors Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell and illustrator Henry Cole introduces children to adoption and LGBTQ couples by following penguins Roy and Silo on their journey to become parents. The story is based on the real Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins, who lived together at the Central Park Zoo and raised a penguin named Tango. (Sadly, Roy and Silo are no longer a couple in real life, which may be a discussion you want to have with kids another day.)

Sam’s Sister

Navigating the adoption process can be stressful, especially for those who arrange to have their children adopted by other parents. But the process can also be hard on the adopted child’s siblings, who may not understand why their parents don’t feel they can adequately care for another child. Sam’s Sister, written by Juliet C. Bond, LCSW and illustrated by Linda Hoffman Kimball, invites readers into Rosa’s world as she questions why her parents chose to find another family for her baby brother, Sam, and how she, ultimately, learns to accept a new family into her life.

The Great Gilly Hopkins

This award-winning classic from author Katherine Paterson is an excellent read for middle school-aged kids. Eleven-year-old Gilly Hopkins has moved between foster homes for most of her life. She’s smart, she’s driven, and now that she’s moved into her most recent house with the Trotters, Gilly has devised a plan to escape. The story is at once funny and heart-wrenching, as Gilly tries to reconnect with her biological mother and learns that love and acceptance sometimes come from the least expected places.

After kids have finished reading, they can watch the adapted film, which features Julia Stiles, Glenn Close, Kathy Bates, Octavia Spencer, and Sophie Nélisse.

The Story of Tracy Beaker

The Story of Tracy Beaker is the first in a series of books told from 10-year-old Tracy’s viewpoint written by Jacqueline Wilson. In this book, readers meet Tracy, a young girl who lives in a children’s residential home that she likes to call “The Dumping Ground.” As you can tell, Tracy isn’t too fond of her current situation.

To cope with her feelings, Tracy makes up elaborate stories and tales about her mother, whom she dreams will raise her again one day. While these tales help Tracy feel better in the short-term, she often finds herself feeling sad and angry with her current situation and doesn’t understand why she can’t fit into a conventional family. Throughout the book, Tracy warms up to new possibilities and learns to love herself.

Please note that this book does tackle issues like neglect, abuse, and violence. It may not be suitable for children under age nine.

Three Little Words: A Memoir

Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s memoir, Three Little Words, revisits her childhood experiences living in 14 different foster homes. In the book, Rhodes-Courter recounts her feelings of loneliness, her frustrations with the system, and the painful memories of her mother and abusive foster parents. The book, while at times heartbreaking and difficult to read, highlights Rhodes-Courter’s strengths as she discovered her self-worth and her voice.

This book is best suited for teens and adults.

A version of this story was originally published in May 2019.

For more great reads with your kids, check out these diverse children’s books featuring girls of color.






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