Ryan Lochte: When Kayla and I Will Consider Having Baby No. 3

Room for one more? Ryan Lochte dished on when he and his wife, Kayla Rae Reid, will consider expanding their brood further with a third child.

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“I am so happy right now with [what we have]. We wanted a boy and then a girl afterwards, and it worked out in our favor,” the 36-year-old pro swimmer told Us Weekly exclusively on Thursday, October 15, while promoting the Piñata app. “Like, it was just perfect. We had the perfect family right now.”

Lochte continued, “But, I mean, it’s not really up to me [if and when we have more kids]. It’s up to the boss lady. And if she wants more, we’re gonna have more. … But I said, ‘Let’s wait after 2021, the Olympics.’ Then we can start popping out more kids if we want.”

The 12-time Olympic medalist married the 29-year-old model in 2018. They welcomed their son Caiden, 3, in 2017 and daughter Liv, 15 months, in 2019.

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Last year, Lochte spoke to Us exclusively about how much his life has changed since becoming the father of two young children. “Kids have changed everything,” he said at the time. “It’s not just me and her anymore. We have to always wake up and care for our little ones.”

The athlete added, “One was hard, two is very hard, but it’s so much fun knowing every time we see our kids, we created this. … It’s pretty awesome to see them grow into people that they’re going to become.”

One thing that hasn’t changed for Lochte and Reid since becoming parents is the strong foundation they have in their romantic relationship. Speaking to Us on Thursday, he explained that the key to their successful marriage is making sure to “do something nice” for your partner every day.

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“I have little Post-it notes in the cupboard. So, when she opens up to get coffee or something, she sees like, ‘You’re beautiful,’ stuff like that,” he explained. “So, I still do a lot of things like that and just being there all the time as much as I can when I’m not swimming. I mean, she’s, like, my best friend. So, that’s awesome.”

Instead of gearing up to expand his family with Reid, Lochte currently has his sights focused on his new partnership with Piñata alongside pal and Celebrity Big Brother costar Jonathan Bennett. Through the unique app, users are rewarded for paying their rent on time.

“Being an Olympian, I was always traveling [and] going to different places, always on the road. Renting was the best thing that fit my lifestyle at the time,” he told Us. “Then, when I found out about Piñata and the rewards that you can get while paying rent, I was, like, my mind was blown. I was like, ‘What? Are you serious? I can actually get rewards for paying rent?’ This is unheard of. So, I immediately teamed up with them.”

With reporting by Christina Garibaldi

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When is HIIT the best exercise fit?

Determining whether high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is an appropriate form of exercise for the average person has been hotly debated for years. But for one UBC Okanagan researcher, there’s not much to debate—interval exercise, when used appropriately, can fit into people’s menu of flexible exercise options.

“The physiological benefits of HIIT or SIT [sprint interval training] are well established,” says Matthew Stork, a postdoctoral fellow in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences and study lead author. “What has been difficult to nail down is if interval-based exercise should be promoted in public health strategies. If so, how can we help people, especially those who are less physically active, get that kind of exercise on a regular basis and over the long term?”

Stork describes interval exercise as repeated short, high-intensity efforts that are separated by periods of low-intensity rest or recovery and that typically last around 20-25 minutes or less. HIIT usually consists of bouts performed around 80-90 percent of a person’s maximum heart rate. SIT involves shorter bouts of activity, but at an even higher, “all-out” intensity.

“While SIT can be attractive for those who feel particularly short on time, it can be pretty off-putting for those that aren’t used to exercising at all-out intensities,” he explains.

And that, says Stork, is why there’s debate among exercise scientists.

While all styles of exercising have similar health benefits, critics of interval exercise argue that it’s not a sustainable public health strategy—it’s high-intensities may deter people from sticking with it in the long-term.

“Unsurprisingly, different people tolerate different exercise programs in different ways,” says Stork. “That makes it difficult to establish the ‘best’ exercise program for the ‘average’ person. There’s little research to unpack the experiences and perceptions of HIIT and SIT compared to traditional continuous exercise in the way we have in this study.”

Stork and his co-authors, including UBC Professor Kathleen Martin Ginis, interviewed 30 inactive adults—18 men and 12 women—before and after they participated in different types of continuous and interval exercise in a controlled lab setting and on their own free time.

Participants discussed the trade-offs of interval versus traditional exercise, the appeal of HIIT or SIT as an idea compared with actually doing it, and creative ways interval exercise can be adapted when working out on their own.

Stork says the factors that influence adherence to traditional or interval training are far more complex than what has been captured in research to date, but there’s certainly room for HIIT and SIT in exercise plans for the general public.

“I think many people assume that they need to go all-in on one form of exercise—if they’re a ‘HIIT person,’ they must have to do HIIT all the time,” he says. “But what I’m seeing is that different forms of exercise can be used interchangeably and that people should approach their exercise with a flexible ‘menu’ of options.”

Stork points to the parent of a toddler as an example.

“Maybe one day you only have 20 minutes to squeeze in a HIIT session while your child naps, but the next day you prefer an hour-long hike up the mountain to destress from work. As long as you’re getting a bit of exercise, you should feel empowered to choose a protocol that fits your needs in that particular time and situation.”

He says the next stage of this research is to determine what tools and resources can be used to help people engage in HIIT or SIT on their own while unsupervised.

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When doing good boosts health, well-being

Performing acts of kindness and helping other people can be good for people’s health and well-being, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. But not all good-hearted behavior is equally beneficial to the giver. The strength of the link depends on many factors, including the type of kindness, the definition of well-being, and the giver’s age, gender and other demographic factors.

The study was published in the journal Psychological Bulletin.

“Prosocial behavior—altruism, cooperation, trust and compassion—are all necessary ingredients of a harmonious and well-functioning society,” said lead author Bryant P.H. Hui, Ph.D., a research assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong. “It is part of the shared culture of humankind, and our analysis shows that it also contributes to mental and physical health.”

Previous studies have suggested that people who engage in more prosocial behavior are happier and have better mental and physical health than those who don’t spend as much time helping others. However, not all studies have found evidence for that link, and the strength of the connection varies widely in the research literature.

To better understand what drives that variation, Hui and his colleagues performed a meta-analysis of 201 independent studies, comprising 198,213 total participants, that looked at the connection between prosocial behavior and well-being. Overall, they found that there was a modest link between the two. Although the effect size was small, it is still meaningful, according to Hui, given how many people perform acts of kindness every day.

“More than a quarter of Americans volunteer, for example,” he said. “A modest effect size can still have a significant impact at a societal level when many people are participating in the behavior.”

Digging deeper into the research, Hui and his colleagues found that random acts of kindness, such as helping an older neighbor carry groceries, were more strongly associated with overall well-being than formal prosocial behavior, such as scheduled volunteering for a charity. That may be because informal helping is more casual and spontaneous and may more easily lead to forming social connections, according to Hui. Informal giving is also more varied and less likely to become stale or monotonous, he said.

The researchers also found a stronger link between kindness and what is known as eudaimonic well-being (which focuses on self-actualization, realizing one’s potential and finding meaning in life), than between kindness and hedonic well-being (which refers to happiness and positive feelings).

The effects varied by age, according to Hui, who began this research at the University of Cambridge. Younger givers reported higher levels of overall well-being, eudaimonic well-being, and psychological functioning, while older givers reported higher levels of physical health. Also, women showed stronger relationships between prosociality and several measures of well-being compared with men—perhaps because women are stereotypically expected to be more caring and giving, and thus derive a stronger sense of good feelings for acting in accordance with those social norms, according to the study.

Finally, the researchers found that studies that were specifically designed to measure the connection between prosociality and well-being showed a stronger link between the two than studies that analyzed data from other large surveys not specifically designed to study the topic.

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Huge mistakes everyone makes when shopping at Bed Bath & Beyond

Bed Bath & Beyond makes the interior designer in us very excited. Thank you to shows like Fixer Upper for making us believe we can all decorate like Joanna Gaines. But luckily, if you struggle finding the right items for your place, the retail giant has a ton of great stuff. From the beautiful bedding options to affordable artwork and sleek appliances ⁠— it really has everything we need. It’s also great for festive occasions, and you can even do your wedding registry at the store. They seriously have one the best dish and silverware sections. And according to CNBC, the secret is out about their robust inventory, as the retail chain brings in nearly $3 billion a year.

However, with all of the options available it can be hard to make the right decision. From picking up expensive back-to-school items to missteps in the clearance section, here’s how to avoid the common mistakes shoppers make at Bed Bath & Beyond.

Buying pricey back-to-school items

When your child is going off to college for the first time your instinct might be to buy them every modern convenience you can, but that isn’t necessarily a great idea. First of all, it’s an impermanent place they’ll be staying and it can get very expensive. Cheatsheet recommends staying away from things like a fancy hamper from Bed Bath & Beyond, which can set you back around $60. Instead, get them a laundry basket that is practical for them to carry to the communal laundry room and is much more cost-effective.

Also, avoid buying from the dorm furniture section at the retail giant. Stylish study setups that have already been curated by the store can come at a hefty price tag of $120. That’s a lot for items your child will probably discard relatively quickly. To stay on budget, try picking out inexpensive furniture from different stores that have not been bundled together.

Not downloading the Bed Bath & Beyond app

The first thing you need to do if you want the most current discounts is sign up for them online at the retail giant’s website (per CBS News). However, if you’re less into receiving coupons by regular mail and more of a tech enthusiast, the app might be a better option. Shopping expert at True Trae, Trae Bodge, explained the app keeps all of your coupons and receipts in one place. This means way less of a mess in your purse with trying to keep track of everything. It also has a very handy feature, where you can scan any barcode in the store for price checks on products.

Another techie hack that can save you 20 percent is signing into your Bed Bath & Beyond account and adding an item to your online shopping cart (via CBS News). Then, exit out of the page by closing the tab. The store often will send an email with a 20 percent off code to encourage you to buy the product. Also, make sure to not throw away coupons you receive in the mail from the chain because they never expire.

Not shopping the clearance section the right way and tossing receipts

The Spruce recommends to not just look at the clearance sections that are typically located in the center aisles. Other sections have their own clearance items, like the bedding section, where you can find some incredible deals. Designer bedding with budget friendly prices? Sign us up! Expert on savings at CouponSherpa.com, Kendal Perez, also suggested shopping the clearance area on Monday. “According to retail insiders, Bed Bath & Beyond restocks its clearance section over the weekend, making the beginning of the week the best time to search for deals,” Perez said (via CBS News).

Another mistake is not saving your receipts. According to The Krazy Coupon Lady, Bed Bath & Beyond recently updated its return policy — which means if you don’t have your receipt, the store will only give you a credit for what the item is currently being sold for and will subtract 20 percent. The store once had a flexible return policy, but Benjamin Glaser from DealNews.com said the chain has gotten stricter. “Returns with a receipt can be made for a full refund, with essentially no time limit,” Glaser explained (via CBS News). So if you decide to buy with cash, make sure to keep those receipts in a safe place.

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The real reason you shouldn’t drink raw milk when pregnant

Maybe you’ve gone most of your life without really questioning what you’re eating. You have friends who talk about non-GMO this and gluten-free that, and you’ve shrugged it off and kept eating your Cocoa Puffs. But all of that can change when you’re pregnant, and you become intensely aware that whatever you put into your mouth is also feeding your baby. Suddenly, you crave free-range chicken and apples picked off the trees of a local orchard. You make yourself a salad from lettuce and carrots that still had a little dirt on them when you bought them at the farmer’s market.

And what about milk? Should you keep on buying that half-gallon at the grocery store — which has been pasteurized to remove bacteria — or does your imagination send you to a barnyard, where a pink-cheeked milkmaid hands you a rustic metal pail, filled with the frothy, raw, unpasteurized milk from that morning’s session with Bessie? According to Nourished Kitchen, raw milk indeed has many health benefits, ranging from enzymes that allow you to better absorb the calcium to beneficial bacteria that support gut health.

But experts warn that it’s extremely dangerous for pregnant women to drink raw milk. Here’s why.

Drinking raw milk when pregnant can cause serious complications

The biggest risk of drinking raw, unpasteurized milk when you’re pregnant is that you could develop Listeria, which causes a miscarriage or stillbirth in 20% of women who contract the pathogen. The American Academy of Pediatrics noted that higher rates of pre-term delivery, as well as sepsis and meningitis in newborns, have all been linked to a Listeria infection due to the mother’s consumption of raw milk (per Live Science). If you’re wondering whether milk from cows that are grass-fed is safe to drink — or if a farmer says the milk is tested to confirm lack of bacteria — the CDC says there’s still a risk that the milk will be unsafe to drink, noting that even healthy animals from clean farms may pass on harmful microorganisms.

What about if you’re not pregnant? Raw milk enthusiasts chug the stuff because they believe in its health benefits and are outraged by government regulations restricting its sale. “Legally, I can feed my children fast food three meals a day. But then to get this incredible, nutrient-dense, fresh local food, the farmer in my state is criminalized for selling that to me,” stay-at-home mom Liz Reitzig told NPR. However, the bottom line comes from Mary Glode, a professor of pediatric infectious disease at Children’s Hospital Colorado: “Pasteurization is one of the major public-health advances of the century. It’s a shame not to take advantage of that.” (via WebMD)

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Here's When a Sore Throat Might Be a Symptom of the Coronavirus

Since news of COVID-19, which was first detected in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, exploded onto the scene, there has been one thing that remains constant: Each day we learn more and more about the virus.

That includes its potential symptoms, which often seem run-of-the-mill. Take a sore throat—you might be tempted to shrug off this symptom, but even as one of the less commonly known ones (the most prevalent are fever, dry cough, tiredness, and shortness of breath), it may still indicate infection.

In fact, the World Health Organization notes that 13.9 percent of COVID-19 patients have presented with sore throats.

“Some patients that have experienced sore throat during COVID-19 have reported that it feels like a super dry throat,” says Leo Nissola, M.D., a scientist and investigator at the COVID-19 National Convalescence Plasma Project as well as advisor at COVIDActNow. “And the medical reports show redness in the throat, without bacterial infection, like strep, for example.”

Is a Sore Throat a Symptom of COVID-19?

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That’s a tricky question.

There are numerous causes for inflammation of the inner lining of the throat, including allergies, upper respiratory infections (both viral and bacterial), acid reflux, and even throat cancer.

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Not to mention this: “There is still so much we don’t know about COVID-19 and what we do know has been evolving over time,” says Inna Husain, M.D., an assistant professor in otolaryngology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

“At this time, all upper respiratory illnesses are COVID-19 until proven otherwise.” What’s more, an April review in the European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology revealed that ear, nose, and throat symptoms may precede the development of severe cases of COVID-19.

That said, “there is nothing intrinsically different between a sore throat brought on by COVID-19 and one brought on by any other upper respiratory infections,” says Michael Lerner, M.D., a Yale Medicine laryngologist and assistant professor of otolaryngology at Yale School of Medicine.

What, Exactly, Does a “Sore Throat” Mean?

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On a basic level, you will experience some sort of discomfort in your throat. More specifically, you’ll feel pain when swallowing that can be achy, sharp, or even create a burning sensation.

A sore throat may also be accompanied by a runny nose, nasal congestion, cough, or fever. Other symptoms, according to Alexandra Kreps, M.D., an internist at Tru Whole Care, include “changes in your voice, swollen lymph nodes in your neck or jaw area, and when looking at your tonsils in a mirror they may be red and irritated or could have white patches or pus if severely infected.”

However, Dr. Nissola, says “it is more likely to be a COVID-related sore throat if there are more symptoms, such as fever and malaise.”

A good rule of thumb: “If your sore throat is also accompanied with fever or cough, be suspicious. If your sore throat comes after an episode of heartburn likely its related to reflux. If it is accompanied by sino-nasal congestion, runny nose, and sneezing, it may be allergies,” says Dr. Husain.

What Should You Do If You Have a Sore Throat?

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How you treat your sore throat symptoms should really consider the root cause.

Generally, though, Dr. Husain recommends hydration (drinking water or tea), steam inhalation, and lozenges containing lubricants such as honey. Pain relievers such as Tylenol can also help with discomfort.

Adds Dr. Lerner: If sore throat is from excessive coughing, you can address it though cough suppressants. For nasal congestion, which causes mouth breathing and dryness, try humidification or hydration through nasal saline or irrigation. “Patients that have COVID-19, should be cautious of nasal spread and do this in a safe way, so as not to expose others to aerosols and droplets that may occur from these types of treatments,” he says.

If sore throat is due to allergies, on the other hand, pretreatment with antihistamine prior to allergy season or known allergen exposure— in other wards take an allergy pill— can be helpful, says Dr. Husain.

Last, if the sore throat is caused by reflux, following an anti-reflux diet may lead to a favorable outcome. “I would encourage people to eliminate anything heavily acidic or citrus as this can irritate the lining of the throat. Hard foods such as crackers or chips can also be irritating,” says Dr. Husain, who notes that if a sore throat is present, avoiding coffee or alcohol as well as reducing smoking cigarettes, smoking marijuana, and avoiding vaping is recommended.

While none of these things will necessarily “cure” a sore throat, they can help with some of the discomfort associated with it.

Should You Get Tested for COVID-19 if You Have a Sore Throat?

“For people with nuisance, acute onset symptoms, or any other listed by the Centers for Disease Control as potentially a symptom for COVID, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider to help determine if testing is appropriate,” says Dr. Learner.

Overall, to help keep COVID-19 or any infection or illness at bay, wash your hands frequently, wear a mask and engage in social-distancing.

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Here's What It Really Means When a Narcissist Says 'I'm Sorry'

Clinical psychologist and therapist Dr. Ramani Durvasula makes videos educating people about how to best spot harmful toxic behavior in others, and what to do to protect yourself and limit the damage that can be wrought when you have a narcissist in your life. Having previously explained why it’s not wise to call out a narcissist, Durvasula’s most recent post explores how to respond if a narcissist actually apologizes for the way they have acted.

“The idea that their apology means they understand what they did, and they’re going to change their behavior, it isn’t true,” she says, “and if you hold that belief, it’s likely that you’re going to be very disappointed.”

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“An apology, done correctly, is taking responsibility; addressing the other person’s feelings, striving for reconciliation, and committing to learning from it,” she continues. “Unfortunately, that’s not what a narcissistic apology is. A narcissistic apology is sort of a way of keeping the trains running on time, of getting off the hook for something, of getting back to the way they want things to be.”

A narcissist doesn’t actually care that they hurt somebody else, and often, Durvasula points out, an apology only comes after a lengthy argument where they believe the person they hurt may take away their “supply.” And in each instance, the narcissist does not learn from the experience or adapt their behavior, and the cycle continues.

It’s pretty easy to identify a narcissist’s apology, simply because they won’t take responsibility for what they did. We’ve all heard that particular kind of non-apology, when somebody sounds like they’re apologizing but really they’re talking around their own accountability by saying things like “I’m sorry you feel that way.”

“In all of these apologies, what you see is that they are not apologizing for something they did or said,” says Durvasula. “They are in essence, though, using the apology as a way of gaslighting you and invalidating your experience: ‘I’m sorry you feel that way,’ meaning ‘you probably shouldn’t.'”

A healthy apology, Durvasula explains, involves acknowledging and owning the original action, not just the reaction. There’s a huge difference between saying “I’m sorry you’re hurt” and “I’m sorry I hurt you, I’ll try to do better.” Durvasula’s three hallmarks of a healthy apology are responsibility, acknowledgment, and commitment.

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The biggest mistake you’re making when you buy plants online

These days, investing in a little bit of greenery for your home seems like a rite of passage. Not only are plants totally on-trend, they also help purify your home’s air (which is important) and have been proven to reduce stress, according to a study in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology. Plus, as Gary L. Altman, associate director of the Horticultural Therapy Program at Rutgers University, told Prevention, “Plants can be used to increase the relative humidity indoors, reduce noise, screen unattractive areas, and moderate room temperature by shading a bright, sunny window.” In other words, they’re a must-have! 

If you don’t have easy access to a garden center (or just don’t feel like going to one), you can easily buy plants online. However, doing so comes with a few risks and it’s important to know exactly what to do and what not to do to ensure you’re spending your hard-earned cash on plants that won’t die immediately.

When buying plants online, read the reviews first

One of the biggest mistakes people make when buying plants online is neglecting to read the reviews. Just as they do for online clothes or kitchenware purchases, reviews can help you determine whether the retailer and products on offer are satisfactory. “This will help you set realistic expectations based on previous customer experiences,” Erin Marino, director of brand marketing for The Sill, told Bob Vila. In other words, there’ll be less chance of disappointment (or a dead plant showing up on your doorstep).

Another common mistake people make purchasing plants online make is not reading all the information about the type of plant they have in their shopping cart, including what’s needed to keep it healthy. If you don’t take into consideration the type of environment the plant needs to survive, you’re setting yourself up for failure. Make sure you have a sunny spot for plants that need tons of light, and a large area for plants that will grow bigger and wider. In other words, it’s crucial that you do your research before you click to buy.

Finally, once the plants arrive, check to see if the soil is wet. If so, it means the plant is at a high risk for developing root rot, and you need to repot it immediately to save it, according to A Natural Curiosity.

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These Fruits and Veggies Could Last Months When Stored The Right Way

Any smart shopper would want their fresh produce to last as long as possible. If it doesn’t go bad fast, it means you can save more money because fresh fruits and vegetables can be pretty expensive. Having to throw away rotten ones and restock again can hurt your food budget and is also wasteful.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, around 94% of food thrown away end up in landfills. This could be lessened just by knowing the right way to purchase, store, and prepare your fruits and vegetables so they will last for as long as possible. But you can also opt to stock up on these products that could last for longer than you would expect, as long as you store and use them correctly.

Potatoes

It’s ideal to store potatoes in 40 degrees Fahrenheit. These veggies don’t like light, so the perfect storage conditions for potatoes is in the basement or a cellar. Light can also make them turn green.

Storing potatoes in this condition keeps them from rotting for around 2 to 4 months. However, keep them away from apples and onions as both of these food items emit gases that could make potatoes ripen faster.

Cabbage

Although cabbage tastes best when it’s fresh, it can also last for up to 2 months if you plan to stock up on it. However, it should be placed inside the fridge and wrapped in plastic. Since cabbages can last longer than lettuce or other delicate leafy greens, it can be used as a stand-in as an ingredient of your salads. Most greens that are frequently used in salads wilt in a matter of days because of their high water content.

Cabbages can be alternatives to salad greens that wilt quickly.

Apples

According to the University of Maine, no other tree fruit could last longer than apples and pears. Under the right conditions, these could last up to 4 months. Apples could thrive in a storage temperature of around 32 degrees Fahrenheit, except for the Honeycrisp variant that should be stored at 36 degrees Fahrenheit because it tends to get a chilling injury.

Among your bunch of apples, consume the largest one first since these are usually the first ones to go bad. Store apples inside a plastic bag and stow it inside the fruit crisper drawer of your refrigerator to prolong it for weeks. Just make sure that you keep them away from veggies. Other vegetables ripen faster when exposed to ethylene gas, which apples emit.

Beets

Beets can be used in a variety of ways. You can slice them up for salads or snack on baked beet chips. It’s a good thing that these veggies can last between 2 to 4 months in your refrigerator if stored properly. If there are still greens attached to the beets, make sure to remove them. After that, place it in a perforated plastic bag and inside the vegetable crisper.

Garlic

These kitchen staples can last the longest when stored at around 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. These should be okay to store inside a dark kitchen cabinet.

A whole bulb could last for months stored inside a paper bag in the fridge. However, all your other food items might taste like garlic if you store them with already cut ones. Once you refrigerate the garlic bulb, you should keep it inside until you are about to use it. Days after it has been taken out from the cold and into room temperature, it will start sprouting.

You should only store unopened bulbs inside the fridge and not sliced ones if you don’t want other food items to acquire a garlicky taste.

Carrots

Carrots give off plenty of moisture, so you have to keep them dry if you intend to use it much later. This is because the moisture makes the carrots rot quicker. If they came in a plastic bag when you bought them from the grocery store, just put in a paper towel inside so it can absorb any moisture from the carrots. Once the paper towel gets saturated, replace it with a new one so you can keep your carrots fresh for up to a few months.

Onions

Onions can last up to a year as long as these are stored in a dry area with a temperature between 30 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit. If you don’t have the proper storage place, just keep it in mesh bags, like the ones used to pack onions sold by the grocery stores. If you store them inside a dark cabinet, they can last to a month or even longer.

Winter Radish

The white-colored daikon variety you see in your local grocery store is more pungent than the red ones you use for spring salads. So, if you’re looking for a healthy supply of fresh produce, don’t store too many of these. Storage for winter radishes is similar to that of carrots. After you remove the greens, place the radishes inside a plastic bag with a paper towel to absorb moisture. That way, these could last for about a month.

You can use shredded or thinly shaved winter radish for your slaw or salad.

Winter Squash

Varieties of winter squash, including pumpkins and butternut squash, can last around 2 to 6 months if stored inside a dark cabinet. Just make sure that you arrange them in a single layer so that air can circulate better. Stocking up on these versatile vegetables is a smart choice since these are packed with nutrients and can be used in a number of recipes.

Frozen Vegetables

Aside from your fresh produce, also hit the frozen foods aisle and stock up on a couple of packs of frozen vegetables. It may be healthier than fresh asparagus, spinach, peas, and other veggies with a short shelf life as these were frozen just hours after being harvested. Plus, you don’t have to worry too much about expiration as long as you keep it inside your freezer.

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