These Baby High Chairs Will Give Them the Safe Boost They Need

Aside from diapers and baby formula, the other constant in your life as a parent of a baby is going to be a reliable baby high chair. Whether you’re eating at home, at a relative’s, or at a restaurant, you’re going to need something to give them a boost while keeping them safely contained so you can eat too. The best baby high chairs come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors that you can match to their favorite outfits or colors. Many high chairs come with different features, so it’s important to consider what’s the best option for you and your little one.

When you’re picking out a baby high chair, you’ll first want to determine where you’re going to use it most. If you’re looking for a travel-friendly version, you’ll want a compact one that’s easy to fit in the car. To avoid buying high chairs as they grow out of them, one that easily adjusts as they grow up is a must. Some high chairs even convert into a step stool, so that’s another smart thing to consider. Ahead, we’ve rounded up the best baby high chairs to meet your needs.

1. Infantino High Chair

They (and you) won’t be able to resist this darling fox baby high chair. This four-in-one baby high chair is also smart too by saving space in your home. It converts from a booster into a toddler chair with ease so it will grow with them as they outgrow their baby high chair. It’s also easy to clean and has an easy release food tray for fuss-free cleaning. You can wipe down the soft cushioning without a problem, too. With front wheels, you can reposition the chair to face however you’d like.

2. Graco Everystep High Chair

If you want a baby high chair that does more than let your little one safely sit, then this convertible option will meet your needs. This smart high chair easily converts from a high chair to a kids step stool for when they need to reach for the counter. With seven total growing stages, you can keep this high chair for years without having to replace it as they get bigger. It’s narrowed down to three stages: the infant high chair with three reclining positions, fully featured baby high chair with seven height positions and dishwasher-safe tray insert, and infant booster seat that brings them right up to the table by attaching to the table.

3. Fisher Price SpaceSaver High Chair

Whether you have tight quarters at home or travel often with baby, this compact baby high chair is going to save a ton of valuable space wherever you go. Not to mention, it has a stylish neutral design that will look great in your home. It may be smaller, but it still packs in all the features of a full size high chair. It even transforms from an infant booster to a toddler one too, so you don’t have to purchase a new one as they get older. There’s two height adjustments and three recline positions for ultimate comfort, and the machine-washable seat pad makes clean ups a breeze. The deep-dish tray prevents food from falling over the edge, too.


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These Children's Books Featuring Adopted/Foster Kids Will Make You Cry

Foster care adoptions reached a record high in 2020 — so why aren’t more kids and parents talking about fostering, or adoption in general, as a key process that has led to so many families being built? Of course, raising these topics with your kids isn’t easy; our words and even our tone can shape adopted and foster kids’ experiences and have a lasting impact on their mental and emotional health. But there are some amazing children’s books featuring adopted or foster kids that can help — teaching both kids and adults how to have thoughtful conversations about adoption and foster homes, and tackling subjects like grief, sadness, confusion, adaptation, and love.

That’s why we’ve gathered some of the most beautiful books out there that are suitable for young children and teens and which center on adoption and foster care. These are beautiful, relatable stories guaranteed to open up discussions and let kids know that they’re not alone in their feelings or experiences.

The Story of My Open Adoption

This heartwarming story, from solo mom by choice (and SheKnows writer!) Leah Campbell, is about Sammy Squirrel who is adopted at birth by the bunny family. A perfect option for teaching kids about the ever-more common open adoption process.

I’ve Loved You Since Forever

We love a lot of things about Hoda Kotb, and her children’s book about adoption is pretty high on the list. Kotb has two adopted daughters, Hope and Haley, whom we just know she has loved since forever. Although Kotb penned this book in response to adopting her eldest daughter, its themes of enduring love apply to any family, adopted or otherwise.

Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born

Many children have questions about their birth, but what happens when a child’s parents weren’t there to recount all of the details? Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born, written by Jamie Lee Curtis and illustrated by Laura Cornell, tells the story of one young girl who loves to hear about the night her parents brought her into their family. This sweet book acknowledges that adopted children have an array of different stories and reminds readers that their births — and all of the moments since — are valuable and cherished by their families.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries

The adoption and foster care processes can be stressful for children who don’t always understand why their situations are changing. Sadly, these experiences can lead to increased risk for poorer physical and mental health in the long run, including depression and anxiety, according to a study commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Too often, these children will internalize their feelings as they may not believe they can confide in a trusted adult.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries, written by Jill Seeney and illustrated by Rachel Fuller, tells the story of Morris the Mole who hides his worries from his loved ones. Throughout the book, Morris’ friends help him to understand that they care about his feelings and want to help him face his problems. With their assistance, Morris learns that while it’s normal to feel worried sometimes, he doesn’t have to experience any of his emotions alone.

Elliot

Placing a child into adoptive or foster care can be a complex and emotionally wrought decision for parents. Often, it can be just as confusing and challenging for children, who don’t understand why their lives are changing or why their parents may not be equipped to provide them with the care they need.

Elliot, written by adoptive mother Julie Pearson and illustrated by Manon Gauthier, is the story about a young rabbit whose parents believe another family could better care for him. Throughout the story, a social worker named Thomas helps Elliot navigate the foster care system in hopes of finding a family who can love and care for Elliot the way he deserves.

While the book has received a lot of positive recognition, some readers have said they felt the book seemed to place blame on Elliot for his changing circumstances because he cries and has outbursts. If you want to read this book with kids, you might want to explain that there’s nothing wrong with Elliot, or any other children in adoptive or foster care, and they are all worthy of love.

Maybe Days: A Book for Children in Foster Care

Maybe Days is a fantastic resource for children who have questions about why they are in foster care and how the process works. Author Jennifer Wilgocki breaks down what kids can expect from their parents, social workers, foster families, and more in ways they can easily digest, while illustrator Alissa Imre Geis’ drawings help younger children visualize various scenarios. The book, published by the American Psychological Association, also helps children get in touch with and better understand their feelings.

Picnic in the Park

No two families are the same, and that’s a reason to celebrate! Picnic in the Park introduces kids to different family dynamics — including families with LGBTQ parents, single parents, adoptive parents, and foster parents — so that they can grasp the beauty and importance of diversity at a young age. Together, author Joe Griffiths and illustrator Tony Pilgrim highlight that while families vary, the one thing they often share in common is love.

And Tango Makes Three

This delightful book from authors Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell and illustrator Henry Cole introduces children to adoption and LGBTQ couples by following penguins Roy and Silo on their journey to become parents. The story is based on the real Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins, who lived together at the Central Park Zoo and raised a penguin named Tango. (Sadly, Roy and Silo are no longer a couple in real life, which may be a discussion you want to have with kids another day.)

Sam’s Sister

Navigating the adoption process can be stressful, especially for those who arrange to have their children adopted by other parents. But the process can also be hard on the adopted child’s siblings, who may not understand why their parents don’t feel they can adequately care for another child. Sam’s Sister, written by Juliet C. Bond, LCSW and illustrated by Linda Hoffman Kimball, invites readers into Rosa’s world as she questions why her parents chose to find another family for her baby brother, Sam, and how she, ultimately, learns to accept a new family into her life.

The Great Gilly Hopkins

This award-winning classic from author Katherine Paterson is an excellent read for middle school-aged kids. Eleven-year-old Gilly Hopkins has moved between foster homes for most of her life. She’s smart, she’s driven, and now that she’s moved into her most recent house with the Trotters, Gilly has devised a plan to escape. The story is at once funny and heart-wrenching, as Gilly tries to reconnect with her biological mother and learns that love and acceptance sometimes come from the least expected places.

After kids have finished reading, they can watch the adapted film, which features Julia Stiles, Glenn Close, Kathy Bates, Octavia Spencer, and Sophie Nélisse.

The Story of Tracy Beaker

The Story of Tracy Beaker is the first in a series of books told from 10-year-old Tracy’s viewpoint written by Jacqueline Wilson. In this book, readers meet Tracy, a young girl who lives in a children’s residential home that she likes to call “The Dumping Ground.” As you can tell, Tracy isn’t too fond of her current situation.

To cope with her feelings, Tracy makes up elaborate stories and tales about her mother, whom she dreams will raise her again one day. While these tales help Tracy feel better in the short-term, she often finds herself feeling sad and angry with her current situation and doesn’t understand why she can’t fit into a conventional family. Throughout the book, Tracy warms up to new possibilities and learns to love herself.

Please note that this book does tackle issues like neglect, abuse, and violence. It may not be suitable for children under age nine.

Three Little Words: A Memoir

Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s memoir, Three Little Words, revisits her childhood experiences living in 14 different foster homes. In the book, Rhodes-Courter recounts her feelings of loneliness, her frustrations with the system, and the painful memories of her mother and abusive foster parents. The book, while at times heartbreaking and difficult to read, highlights Rhodes-Courter’s strengths as she discovered her self-worth and her voice.

This book is best suited for teens and adults.

A version of this story was originally published in May 2019.

For more great reads with your kids, check out these diverse children’s books featuring girls of color.






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These Fruits and Veggies Could Last Months When Stored The Right Way

Any smart shopper would want their fresh produce to last as long as possible. If it doesn’t go bad fast, it means you can save more money because fresh fruits and vegetables can be pretty expensive. Having to throw away rotten ones and restock again can hurt your food budget and is also wasteful.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, around 94% of food thrown away end up in landfills. This could be lessened just by knowing the right way to purchase, store, and prepare your fruits and vegetables so they will last for as long as possible. But you can also opt to stock up on these products that could last for longer than you would expect, as long as you store and use them correctly.

Potatoes

It’s ideal to store potatoes in 40 degrees Fahrenheit. These veggies don’t like light, so the perfect storage conditions for potatoes is in the basement or a cellar. Light can also make them turn green.

Storing potatoes in this condition keeps them from rotting for around 2 to 4 months. However, keep them away from apples and onions as both of these food items emit gases that could make potatoes ripen faster.

Cabbage

Although cabbage tastes best when it’s fresh, it can also last for up to 2 months if you plan to stock up on it. However, it should be placed inside the fridge and wrapped in plastic. Since cabbages can last longer than lettuce or other delicate leafy greens, it can be used as a stand-in as an ingredient of your salads. Most greens that are frequently used in salads wilt in a matter of days because of their high water content.

Cabbages can be alternatives to salad greens that wilt quickly.

Apples

According to the University of Maine, no other tree fruit could last longer than apples and pears. Under the right conditions, these could last up to 4 months. Apples could thrive in a storage temperature of around 32 degrees Fahrenheit, except for the Honeycrisp variant that should be stored at 36 degrees Fahrenheit because it tends to get a chilling injury.

Among your bunch of apples, consume the largest one first since these are usually the first ones to go bad. Store apples inside a plastic bag and stow it inside the fruit crisper drawer of your refrigerator to prolong it for weeks. Just make sure that you keep them away from veggies. Other vegetables ripen faster when exposed to ethylene gas, which apples emit.

Beets

Beets can be used in a variety of ways. You can slice them up for salads or snack on baked beet chips. It’s a good thing that these veggies can last between 2 to 4 months in your refrigerator if stored properly. If there are still greens attached to the beets, make sure to remove them. After that, place it in a perforated plastic bag and inside the vegetable crisper.

Garlic

These kitchen staples can last the longest when stored at around 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. These should be okay to store inside a dark kitchen cabinet.

A whole bulb could last for months stored inside a paper bag in the fridge. However, all your other food items might taste like garlic if you store them with already cut ones. Once you refrigerate the garlic bulb, you should keep it inside until you are about to use it. Days after it has been taken out from the cold and into room temperature, it will start sprouting.

You should only store unopened bulbs inside the fridge and not sliced ones if you don’t want other food items to acquire a garlicky taste.

Carrots

Carrots give off plenty of moisture, so you have to keep them dry if you intend to use it much later. This is because the moisture makes the carrots rot quicker. If they came in a plastic bag when you bought them from the grocery store, just put in a paper towel inside so it can absorb any moisture from the carrots. Once the paper towel gets saturated, replace it with a new one so you can keep your carrots fresh for up to a few months.

Onions

Onions can last up to a year as long as these are stored in a dry area with a temperature between 30 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit. If you don’t have the proper storage place, just keep it in mesh bags, like the ones used to pack onions sold by the grocery stores. If you store them inside a dark cabinet, they can last to a month or even longer.

Winter Radish

The white-colored daikon variety you see in your local grocery store is more pungent than the red ones you use for spring salads. So, if you’re looking for a healthy supply of fresh produce, don’t store too many of these. Storage for winter radishes is similar to that of carrots. After you remove the greens, place the radishes inside a plastic bag with a paper towel to absorb moisture. That way, these could last for about a month.

You can use shredded or thinly shaved winter radish for your slaw or salad.

Winter Squash

Varieties of winter squash, including pumpkins and butternut squash, can last around 2 to 6 months if stored inside a dark cabinet. Just make sure that you arrange them in a single layer so that air can circulate better. Stocking up on these versatile vegetables is a smart choice since these are packed with nutrients and can be used in a number of recipes.

Frozen Vegetables

Aside from your fresh produce, also hit the frozen foods aisle and stock up on a couple of packs of frozen vegetables. It may be healthier than fresh asparagus, spinach, peas, and other veggies with a short shelf life as these were frozen just hours after being harvested. Plus, you don’t have to worry too much about expiration as long as you keep it inside your freezer.

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Can't sleep? Try these acupressure techniques to help you drift off

When you’re tossing and turning and sleep just won’t come, you’ll try anything – fancy pillow sprays, herbal remedies, hypnotherapy apps, desperately ringing up a pal and asking them to tell you a bedtime story.

In these dire situations, it’s worth giving acupressure a go, mostly because it’s free, easy to do, and if it doesn’t work you haven’t lost anything.

And actually, it just might work. Then you’ll get to drift off into rest and everything will be dreamy.

We chatted to Renata Nunes, a physiotherapist, massage therapist, and acupuncturist, who shared her guide to simple acupressure techniques you can do on yourself at home to help you get some sleep.

‘Chinese medicine understands insomnia as disharmony between Yin and Yang,’ Renata explains.

‘The energy between Yin and Yang must be harmonious and must flow into each other in a daily cycle. Yang energy should flow during the day and Yin energy at night.

‘Yang is brilliant energy, the sun, the day, occurs intensely, Yin is passive energy, at night, it occurs in a timid way. Someone with insomnia has a greater Yang tendency than Yin.

‘Treatment must find the balance between Yin and Yang, fire and water. In this case, fire is represented by the heart and water is represented by the kidney.

‘The ideal would be to make an assessment to check the disharmonies of each patient. However, in this time of isolation, we can work with some points to help calm the mind and sleep better.’

Don’t get put off by the Yin and Yang talk – you don’t necessarily need to buy into all of that to see benefits from acupressure techniques.

Ready? Let’s try these.

Yintang – to calm the mind

Yintang describes the point right between the eyebrows.

Renata says: ‘Make a very gentle massage between the inner ends of the two eyebrows in a circular motion clockwise.

Also you can tap the point with your fingertip.

‘As you apply the pressure allow all the muscles of your forehead to relax. This is a good point to calm the mind and insomnia.’

GV 20 – to dispel negative thoughts

This is at the top of the head, in the middle of the line that connects the apex of the two ears. You can press the point down and back.

Try making circular movements counterclockwise direction.

Renata says this technique can also help to relieve headaches.

Heart 7

Applying pressure to this area is said to help relieve insomnia, irritability, and chest pain.

‘Draw a vertical line between your fourth and fifth finger and stop at the crease of the wrist,’ Renata explains. ‘The point is at the height of the wrist crease next to the tendon.

‘You can press the point and make circular movements in a clockwise direction. Also, you can rub the whole wrist.’

Kidney 6 – to nourish kidney Yin

This is the spot on the inner side of the foot, in the depression below the ankle .

Renata recommends pressing this point, making circular movements in a clockwise direction, and tapping it, to help ‘calm the mind, open the chest, and invigorate the kidney’.

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