Expert Reveals Why Rich People Are Acquiring Race Horses

Millionaires who currently do not have the billions that can help them purchase their personal sports team have begun to spend millions on alternatively buying racehorses. According to Keeneland Racing’s racing and sales’ Vice president, Bob Ellison, a lot of excitement comes with being the owner of Thoroughbred horses.

Ellison mentioned that the millionaires are so enthusiastic about getting a good deal and that has willingly made them spend so much on high-quality horses. According to him, twenty-seven horses at the sale were sold for one million dollars or above. 14 of the buyers were international buyers while 13 of them were from the US. Three other horses were sold for over $2 million while there was a yearling that sold for $2.4 million. In summary, the buyers spent about $377 million on the purchase of about 3,000 yearlings.

Expensive Hobby

Ellison mentioned that this activity is a form of investment but added that acquiring race horses didn’t just become a hobby for the richest people all around the world. It can sometimes cost several thousands of dollars to acquire prized horses.

Polo, considered to be the sport for kings, is most times regarded as a hobby for members of the upper class. It is one where the elite gather to have cocktails and also socialize as they watch the sport. Yearly, socialites, designers, and Hollywood stars attend the Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic. In fact, Chinese billionaires are reportedly beginning to see Polo as the new elite sport.

It is at the Kentucky Derby that some horses purchased at the Keeneland Sale compete. Ellison noted that the famous guests here  include Peter Brand ruling houses from the Middle East, Bobby Flay, George Strawbridge and Charlotte Webber,

The Vice president of UAE, Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, reportedly purchased 27 yearlings for about twenty million dollars at this year’s sale. The total purchases included seven yearlings he bought for over a million dollars. The Vice President is considered one of the biggest owners of such horses in the world. He also owns a huge stable and different racing operations. Sheikh Hamdan, his brother, also bought 19 horses spending over $12 million.

Investment Opportunity

It is important to examine if these horse purchases have the potentials and can eventually become money makers for their buyers. Ellison noted that the possibility of that is dependent on the extent to which the horses race after they are sold. For instance, Justify was purchased for $500,000 and after it won the Triple Crown for this year, the horse is now worth a whopping $75 million.

Generally, breeders put in much effort into grooming horses for top sales as well as promising returns, be it through natural practices or commercial practices. According to Ellison, some breeders treat horses as is if they were tomatoes as they polish and feed them in an environment that is highly controlled, while some other breeders prefer to raise horses in the field. He added that irrespective of the method that the breeders used for raising the horses this year, the horses appeared to have more mass and are more athletically built.

Ellison added that while some buyers are particular about the size of the horse, how it looks racing, how its coat looks and how muscular it is, other buyers are particular about a horse that can run on grass and so want to know how fast the horses can finally transition to a race track.

Ellison, however, stated that there are some things buyers ought to consider to increase their chances of getting a better return. One of such is that colts, i.e. male horses, are generally worth more than fillies or mares (female horses).

Also, purchasing more than a yearling at each sale increases the chances of winning. Also the pedigree of the yearling matters.

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UK researchers will deliberately reinfect people with COVID-19 in new ‘challenge study’

Researchers in the U.K. are looking for volunteers who have already had COVID-19 for a “challenge study” that will deliberately reexpose them to the novel coronavirus.

The goal of the study is to understand what immune response is needed to protect against reinfection with COVID-19, according to a statement from the University of Oxford, which has received approval to conduct the trial.

“If we could understand, in this really careful controlled way, exactly what kind of immune response is needed for protection [against reinfection], then we will be able to look at people who have natural infection and say whether or not they’re protected” against another infection, study chief investigator Dr. Helen McShane, a professor of vaccinology at the University of Oxford, said in a video about the study

In a challenge study, people who are at low risk of serious outcomes are intentionally exposed to a pathogen in a controlled lab environment. Earlier this year, other researchers in the U.K. began challenge studies in people who hadn’t been infected with COVID-19, deliberately exposing them to very small doses of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. 

For the new study, the researchers are recruiting healthy people ages 18 to 30 who were infected with COVID-19 at least three months prior to entering the study and have antibodies against the novel coronavirus, according to The Guardian.

The study will have two phases. The first phase, which will include 24 volunteers, aims to determine the lowest dose of SARS-CoV-2 that can cause an infection while producing little or no symptoms in the volunteers. 

“We start with a really, really small amount of the virus … and we check that that’s safe,” and then increase the dose if necessary (if it’s too low to cause an infection in any of the volunteers), McShane said in the video. 

“Our target is to have 50% of our subjects infected but with no, or only very mild, disease,” McShane told The Guardian.

The second phase will involve another 10 to 40 participants who will receive the dose determined in the first phase. The researchers hope to learn what levels of antibodies, T cells and other immune system components protect against reinfection.

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After being exposed to the virus, all of the participants will be quarantined for 17 days and  monitored closely. They will undergo numerous tests, including CT scans of their lungs and MRIs of their hearts, the researchers said.

Any participants who develop symptoms of COVID-19 will be treated with Regeneron’s monoclonal antibodies, which have been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalizations from COVID-19.

The participants will be followed for at least eight months after they recover from their second infection. Each participant will receive nearly $7,000 (£5,000) for being included in the study, The Guardian reported.

The first phase of the study is expected to start this month, and the second phase is expected to begin in the summer, the researchers said.

Originally published on Live Science.   

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How common is stroke in people critically ill with COVID-19?

covid

A large, year-long study has found that among people with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU), 2% experienced a stroke after they were admitted to the ICU. The preliminary study released today, April 15, 2021, will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021. The study also found that hemorrhagic stroke, a bleeding stroke, was associated with a higher risk of death among people in the ICU, but ischemic stroke, a stroke caused by a blood clot blocking an artery, was not.

“Stroke has been a known serious complication of COVID-19 with some studies reporting a higher-than-expected occurrence, especially in young people,” said study author Jonathon Fanning, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “However, among the sickest of patients, those admitted to an ICU, our research found that stroke was not a common complication and that a stroke from a blood clot did not increase the risk of death.”

Researchers used an international database of COVID-19 patients in 52 countries admitted to an ICU between January 1 and December 21, 2020. They identified 2,699 people who were admitted to an ICU for management of severe COVID-19 infection. Of those, 59 had a stroke. The people had an average age of 53.

Researchers evaluated the patient data at 370 hospital ICUs and found 59 people, or 2.2%, experienced a stroke during their stay in the ICU. Of those, 19 people, or 32%, had a stroke from a clot, 27 people, or 46%, had a bleeding stroke, and 13 people, or 22%, had an unspecified stroke.

Researchers determined that people who had a bleeding stroke had up to five times greater risk of death than people without stroke. However, people who had a stroke from a clot had no increased risk of death.

Of the people with bleeding stroke, 72% died, but of those, only 15% died of stroke. Instead, multiorgan failure was the leading cause of death.

“For people with COVID-19 in intensive care, our large study found that stroke was not common, and it was infrequently the cause of death,” said Fanning. “Still, COVID-19 is a new disease and mutations have resulted in new variants, so it’s important to continue to study stroke in people with the disease. More importantly, while the proportion of those with a stroke may not be as high as we initially thought, the severity of the pandemic means the overall absolute number of patients around the world who will suffer a stroke and the ongoing implications of that for years to come, could create a major public health crisis.”

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Khloé Kardashian Speaks Out After Unauthorized Photo's Release: 'How I Choose to Look Is My Choice'

Khloé Kardashian is getting candid with her followers about her body image struggles after an unedited photo of her was posted to social media earlier this week without her permission.

In an Instagram post Wednesday, the Keeping Up with the Kardashians star, 36, shared unedited photos and video of herself as she opened up about trying to learn to love herself despite the "unbearable" scrutiny she faces.

"Hey guys, this is me and my body unretouched and unfiltered," she wrote. "The photo that was posted this week was beautiful. But as someone who has struggled with body image her whole life, when someone takes a photo of you that isn't flattering in bad lighting or doesn't capture your body the way it is after working to hard to get it to this point – and then shares it to the world – you should have every right to ask for it not to be shared – no matter who you are."

She continued, "In truth, the pressure, constant ridicule and judgment my entire life to be perfect and to meet other's standards of how I should look has been too much to bear."

RELATED: Khloé Kardashian Says Comments About Her Appearance Can Affect Her 'Soul and Confidence'

She then listed examples of unkind remarks that have been made about her: "'Khloé is the fat sister.' 'Khloé is the ugly sister.' 'Her dad must not be her real dad because she looks so different.' 'The only way she could have lost that weight must have been from surgery.'"

"You never quite get used to being judged and pulled apart and told how unattractive one is, but I will say if you hear anything enough then you will start to believe it," she added. "This is how I have been conditioned to feel, that I am not beautiful enough just being me."

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Khloé said that, the same way she wears makeup or gets her nails done, she uses filters and photo edits to "present myself to the world the way I want to be seen," adding that "it's exactly what I will continue to do unapologetically."

She concluded, "My body, my image and how I choose to look and what I want to share is my choice. It's not for anyone to decide or judge what is acceptable anymore."

The star's post was met with sisterly support with Kim Kardashian appearing in the Live with her and Kendall Jenner commenting 'YESSSS."

Last month, Khloé revealed how the online ridicule can take a toll on her after one of her fans posted a TikTok video in her defense following a slew of headlines comparing the star's looks over the years.

"I don't want anyone to kiss my ass. I'm not asking for that. But what I am asking for is for people to realize just what articles like this does to someone's soul and confidence," Khloé admitted.

"I am so very grateful and appreciative of anyone who stands up to bullying or people writing story's [sic] simply for clickbait. Defending someone, Especially when we don't know one another makes [my] heart happy. That's the person I am. I like to defend what is right. Thank you everyone for you sweet comments and thank you @mackincasey for being so kind 🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽," the star continued, thanking the fan who posted the supportive TikTok video.

Khloé recently told PEOPLE that, with so much hate and negativity on social media, she tries to focus on spreading uplifting messages instead — and she has no plans on stopping anytime soon.

"I think the world right now, we have too much negativity at our fingertips. Just as much negativity, there is positivity, but we don't highlight it as much as we do the negative," she said.

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The Bystander Effect Explains Why Some People Don't Help When Others Are In Danger-Here's How to Fight Against It

What-Is-The-Bystander-Effect-GettyImages-1202279688-1267295319

The data is clear: Hate crimes against Asian Americans have skyrocketed since the pandemic began. Anti-violence organization Stop AAPI Hate reported nearly 3,800 incidents against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders from March 2020 to February 2021, and New York City alone had an 867% increase in Asian hate crime victims in 2020 compared to the previous year.

What's most shocking? Some of these crimes have happened right in front of other people—who haven't stepped in to help. In a video that's now gone viral, a 65-year-old Asian American woman can be seen being thrown to the ground and repeatedly assaulted in full view of security guards in a building nearby. The security guards look out and clearly see what's going on, as one of them closes the door on her.

Plenty of people online have expressed shock and outrage that something like this could happen right in front of others, with no one rushing to help. But this kind of thing happens more often than you'd think. In fact, it's a social phenomenon with a name. It's called the bystander effect, and it's been well documented for decades. Here's what you need to know.

What exactly is the bystander effect?

The bystander effect is a social psychology theory that says that a person is less likely to offer help to a victim when more people are around, Todd Lucas, PhD, a social and health psychologist at Michigan State University, tells Health. "It's an irony of human behavior," he says.

The term was first coined in the 1960s by psychologists Bibb Latané and John Darley who analyzed the 1964 murder of a woman named Kitty Genovese in New York City. Genovese was stabbed to death outside of her apartment, but none of her neighbors reacted to help her, even though they were aware of what was going on.

"It's really a classic example of unhelpful behavior," Victoria Banyard, PhD, associate director for the Center on Violence Against Women and Children at the Rutgers School of Social Work, tells Health.

Why does the bystander effect happen?

There are a few possible reasons for this. One is what Lucas calls "diffusion of responsibility." Meaning, the more people there are around, the less any single person feels responsible for helping in any situation.

People are also "social creatures" and we tend to react to social cues from those around us, Banyard says. "We want to fit in and, if other people seem to think this isn't serious, we tend to react the same way," she says.

Experts say this is potentially damaging on so many levels. On a very basic—but important—level, the bystander effect increases the odds that someone will get hurt. "There may be a chance to keep something from escalating and prevent someone from being harmed if people actually intervene," Banyard says.

But the bystander effect isn't just harmful on a physical level—it's damaging on a mental level for the victim, too. "It sends a message to the victim that people don't think they're worth helping," Banyard says.

What you can do to stop the bystander effect

It's easy to think you wouldn't fall victim to the bystander effect, but it's a common social phenomenon that has impacted plenty of others. If you notice something seems off in a crowd but no one else is reacting, Lucas recommends listening to your gut. "Be confident in your values and assessment of the situation," he says. "If you think somebody needs help, recognize that might be correct. Even if no one else is acting, it may be appropriate to act."

One person taking action can create a domino effect, where others recognize that there is a problem and step in to help, too, Lucas says. "You don't need to be the person that fixes the situation entirely—you just need to be the person who starts the chain reaction," he says.

If you're a victim in a crowd and no one is helping you, Lucas recommends singling out a particular person or looking for someone who seems like they could be helpful and appealing directly to them. "You can better overcome a bystander effect that way," he says.

Even simply being aware that the bystander effect is a thing can be helpful, Banyard says. Organizations like Hollaback and Step Up also have courses you can take to learn more about the bystander effect and strategies for intervening in different situations.

And, of course, if you see someone being victimized, do your best to intervene. "Take action," Banyard says. "It's simple."

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Homelessness associated with increased HIV and HCV risk among people who inject drugs

HIV

Homelessness and unstable housing are associated with a substantial increase in HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) acquisition risk among people who inject drugs, according to research led by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Behavioral Science and Evaluation at the University of Bristol.

The study, published in The Lancet Public Health today [26 March] found that, among people who inject drugs, recent homelessness and unstable housing were associated with a 55 percent and 65 percent increase in HIV and HCV acquisition risk, respectively.

The study is the first systematic review and meta-analysis (a statistical method used to combine the results of multiple studies) to assess whether homelessness or unstable housing increases HIV or HCV risk among people who inject drugs. The researchers extracted and pooled data from 45 previous studies providing 70 estimates (26 for HIV and 44 for HCV) to work out a more robust measure of the risks.

Globally, there are an estimated 15.6 million people who inject drugs; over one in six are infected with HIV and over half have been infected with HCV. People who inject drugs are at high risk of HIV and HCV infection through the sharing of needles, syringes and other injecting equipment and experience high levels of homelessness and unstable housing.

Globally, an estimated 22 percent of people who inject drugs reported experiencing homelessness or unstable housing in the past year, with this increasing to 42 percent in England (having increased from 28 percent in the last decade), and 50 percent in North America.

A high proportion of people in unstable housing have substance misuse problems, with 30 percent reporting they used heroin in the last month in the UK, highlighting the overlapping risks of drug use and homelessness.

Previous research also suggests that homeless or unstably housed drug users are less likely to access HIV and HCV treatment and use opioid substitution therapy and needle-syringe programs, two important HIV and HCV prevention interventions. They may also be more likely to engage in high-risk injecting and sexual behaviours and more likely to have been recently imprisoned, another factor associated with increased HIV and HCV acquisition risk.

Chiedozie Arum, lead author from the University of Bristol, said: “Our study highlights the overlapping bio-social problems that worsen health inequalities among homeless people who inject drugs. Expanding access to prevention and treatment services and improving housing provision for this population should be prioritized.”

Dr. Jack Stone, Senior Research Associate from the University of Bristol and joint senior author, said: “Our findings suggest housing instability is an important driver of HIV and HCV transmission among people who inject drugs. Further research is now needed to better understand how homelessness or unstable housing increases the risk of HIV and HCV acquisition, and what interventions could have most impact in reducing this risk.”

Peter Vickerman, Professor of Infectious Disease Modelling from the University of Bristol and joint senior author, said “This research adds to the growing evidence on the damaging effect of housing instability on health and social outcomes. A comprehensive policy approach that not only provides housing but also addresses many of the interlinked health and social concerns of this population is necessary in order to reduce HIV and HCV risk.”

The study has important implications for policy and public health, including:

  • the need for housing interventions tailored to people who inject drugs that address their competing health and social concerns
  • the need for improved access to HIV and HCV prevention and treatment interventions among those who are homeless or unstably housed
  • the need for these interventions to be integrated within services that provide for the wide ranging health needs of these vulnerable populations
  • the need to reduce stigma towards homelessness and drug use that act as barriers to accessing care.

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The Truth About Whether Vaccinated People Can Spread COVID-19

With the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccine, it’s been a “learn as we go” kind of situation. Consider that at first, it was widely reported vaccinated individuals could still potentially spread the illness to those who had not received their shots. For instance, a December 9, 2021 New York Times story advised even if you were immunized, you should still wear a mask because it was unknown if you would spread the virus to others.

But now, the Centers for Disease Control is updating this information, noting that given more time, researchers have been able to determine vaccinated people are unlikely to pass on the infection that has forever changed our lives.

“Vaccinated people do not carry the virus, don’t get sick, and that is not just in the clinical trials but it’s also in real world data,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle P. Walensky explained during an appearance on The Rachel Maddow Show this week (via People).

Why vaccinated people are unlikely to spread COVID-19 to others

Of course, it is not impossible for a vaccinated person to get sick with COVID-19, with reports emerging that fully-immunized individuals have been infected (via Forbes).

But, as Dr. Robert Gallo, a virus expert at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, told ABC News, “A vaccinated person controls the virus better, so the chances of transmitting will be greatly reduced.”

Data is encouraging, with current studies show less virus is present in the nose of a vaccinated individual. But overall, as People reports, getting vaccinated means you are 90 percent less likely to get infected two weeks after the second shot — so, less people are getting sick in the first place, making them less likely to pass on the infection.

It’s important to note asymptomatic infections in vaccinated people are still possible — so wearing a mask even after getting both shots is still highly recommended.

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Two new diabetes drugs may work better for Asian people

diabetes

Two relatively new but increasingly used diabetes drugs (with one of these classes also now approved for used in heart failure in people with or without diabetes) are possibly more effective in people with an Asian background than in people with a White background, according to new research.

The study—published in Diabetes Care and led by the University of Glasgow—found the diabetes drug classes GLP-1 receptor agonists and SGLT2 inhibitors may work better at lowering the risk of heart attack and stroke, and heart failure and death from heart disease, respectively.

People with an Asian background, including South Asian and East/Southeast people, experience a greater burden of type 2 diabetes compared with those with a White background.

Of the antihyperglycemic drug classes used to treat diabetes, drug classes GLP-1 receptor agonists and SGLT2 inhibitors are the only ones to show consistent benefits in cardiovascular outcomes. In this study, researchers meta-analyzed data from six trials of SGLT2is; four diabetes trials and two heart failure outcome trials. They also analyzed data from six diabetes outcome trials for the GLP-1 receptor agonist class.

The study found a greater benefit of GLP-1RA therapy on heart attack and stroke risks in people with an Asian background compared with those with a White background across all types of the drug tested. In addition, SGLT2i drugs had at least as good an effect on reducing risk of major cardiovascular events in people with diabetes in Asians, but potentially had a better effect on heart failure outcomes in this group compared with Whites in the heart failure trials.

Naveed Sattar, Professor of Metabolic Medicine at the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, said: “These data show something potentially exciting for doctors treating Asians with diabetes. That Asians may benefit more from a class of drugs to lower heart attack and stroke risks in people with diabetes is exciting, since diabetes is more common in many Asian populations, and finding new ways to lower their cardiovascular risks is helpful.”

“At the same time, potentially better outcomes in Asians with heart failure with SGLT2 inhibitors is also exciting. Such findings now need confirmation and future trials should better categorize people with an Asian background into differing subgroups so that we can work out whether the findings apply to all people with an Asian background or specific subgroups.”

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The Small Space-Friendly Elliptical That's ‘Worth Every Penny’ Is Just $150 at Amazon

If you're used to working out at the gym, chances are you've developed a sense of loyalty to your favorite machine — which means adjusting to working out from home probably came with its challenges. While the treadmill can be swapped with outdoor runs and cycling class can be substituted with biking,  there's one machine that doesn't quite have a simple alternative: The elliptical.

When you want to get your heart rate up in a way that's gentle on your joints, ellipticals are a great option. Most models, however, are large and pricey — but there's one budget-friendly alternative that over 4,800 Amazon shoppers love. Sunny Health & Fitness's SF-E905 Elliptical Machine is made for small spaces and is currently on sale for $150.

At just 28 inches long and 17 inches wide, the elliptical has eight different levels of resistance that you can adjust according to your preferences. It also has a small digital monitor that displays time, speed, distance, calories burned, and pulse. 

The compact size of the machine has made it especially appealing to those creating home gyms during the pandemic — some people even called it the "best quarantine purchase ever."

Buy It! Sunny Health & Fitness's SF-E905 Elliptical Machine, $149.17 (orig. $179.00); amazon.com

The stride of the Sunny Health & Fitness elliptical is 11 inches, which is shorter than most ellipticals, but shoppers say it still does the job without taking up a lot of space. "I get on this thing for almost 30 minutes and I come out sweating everywhere. It WILL work you hard and it's one of the best things to have to burn fat or even just to stay active," wrote one. "Honestly, everyone should have at least one of these in their house."

With a 220-pound weight limit, it may not be the best choice for tall users, but many customers say they've quickly adjusted to the smaller size of the elliptical. "I'm 5'6 and about 135 pounds. Like others have said, the stride is noticeably shorter than a standard machine BUT you literally get used to it in 30 seconds," said another. "The short stride actually makes for a harder workout in my opinion. I feel the burn in the thighs — something I never felt after using a standard one. And it is shockingly quiet. Seriously."

For its low price and slim size, reviewers seem to agree that this Sunny Health & Fitness elliptical is "worth every penny" — and its current discount makes it even more impressive.


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