Kids Often Hit Hard by Death of Beloved Pet, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2020 — The loss of a pet may be a child’s first encounter with death, and new research suggests no one should underestimate the psychological trauma that the loss can bring.

Previous studies have found that kids form deep emotional attachments to their pets and having a furry companion in your youth has been linked to greater empathy, self-esteem and social skills.

“The effects of pet loss were unique,” said study co-author Erin Dunn, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Center for Genomic Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

To learn more, she and her hospital colleagues looked at a sample of more than 6,000 British children. Almost 9 out of 10 had owned a pet during their youth, and more than half had lost one during their first seven years of life.

Information was collected as a part a long-term study of parents and kids in Britain. When kids were 8 years old, their mothers filled out questionnaires about their youngsters’ mental health symptoms.

“For example, how often does your child feel sad, depressed or anxious — these are the kind of emotional and behavioral indicators that are used to identify and characterize children who might be experiencing some mental health-related challenges,” said Dunn.

The research team found that kids who lost a pet were more likely to have poor mental health. And the link held true after accounting for other distressing factors, including financial hardship, parental physical or emotional abuse, and physical or sexual abuse by anyone.

While a child’s mental well-being can be affected by many other adversities, the effects of pet loss “were not explained by these other hardships,” Dunn said.

And boys seemed to be affected more deeply than girls, the study found.

“The boys had more psychopathology symptoms — or a greater effect of the pet death, as compared to their female counterparts,” said co-author Katherine Crawford, who worked on the study while at Massachusetts General Hospital. She’s now a genetic counselor at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island in Providence.

Crawford added that the questionnaire used to evaluate well-being does not serve as a definitive diagnosis of any mental health disorder. But, she said, it asks “a lot of the same questions that one might when evaluating those mental health concerns.”

While the study did not examine how best to help a child cope with losing a furry friend, researchers suggested that being aware and recognizing a child’s emotions is a good start.

George Holden is chairman of the psychology department at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. He advised parents to talk frankly with their children regarding the loss of a pet.

“All too often parents think, erroneously, that if they don’t mention something, it’s better — it will go away,” said Holden, who wasn’t part of the study. “That’s absolutely wrong. It’s much better to directly recognize what’s going on, talk about it, and hear the child’s perspective.”

He also suggested being proactive and preparing a child for the inevitable if a pet is old or sick.

Struggling with the loss of a pet is entirely normal, Holden added, as they are often very well-loved family members.

Despite the emotional toll of losing a pet, researchers are not suggesting that parents avoid getting one.

Dunn suggested that further research should explore the “positive benefits of pet ownership because that kind of information would help parents in weighing the cost-benefit ratio of having pets.”

The findings were recently published online in the journal European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Source: Read Full Article

Fewer kids may be carrying coronavirus without symptoms than believed, study says

(HealthDay)—Are infected-but-healthy children major “silent spreaders” of the new coronavirus? New research out of northern Italy, once a COVID-19 hotspot, suggests they might not be.

Rigorous COVID-19 testing of children and adults admitted to a hospital in Milan for reasons other than coronavirus found that just over 1% of kids tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, compared to more than 9% of adults.

That suggests a very low rate of asymptomatic infection among children, and does “not support the hypothesis that children are at higher risk of carrying SARS-CoV-2 asymptomatically than adults,” the researchers reported in the Sept. 14 online edition of JAMA Pediatrics.

One U.S. expert in infectious disease found the report encouraging.

“Since the start of the pandemic it has been very difficult to determine what the actual role of children in the spread of the virus is,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at the Center for Health Security at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore.

“It is becoming clear that they do not amplify this virus the way they do influenza when it comes to community spread,” Adalja said.

In the new study, physicians led by Dr. Carlo Agostoni, of the Ca’Granda Foundation Maggiore Polyclinic Hospital in Milan, conducted two sets of nasal swab tests, up to two days apart, on 214 newly admitted patients.

Eighty-three of these new admissions were children and 131 were adults. All were admitted to the hospital in March and April, at the height of northern Italy’s COVID-19 outbreak. However, all of the patients were admitted for reasons unconnected to COVID-19, and none had shown any symptoms of the illness.

So how many were secretly carrying the virus nonetheless? Based on the swab tests, only 1.2% of the pediatric patients turned up positive for infection, compared to 9.2% of adults.

The low rate of carriage among kids in a city with a burgeoning number of COVID-19 cases suggests “that [children’s] role as facilitators of the spreading of SARS-CoV-2 infection could be reconsidered,” the study authors wrote.

Still, the researchers stressed that this is a small sample from just one hospital, so the findings shouldn’t be considered definitive.

And of course community outbreaks of COVID-19 tied to asymptomatic but infected children are happening in the United States. On Friday, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a report on a cluster of cases originating from two Salt Lake City day care facilities. The report found that 12 youngsters infected with coronavirus (only three showed any symptoms) enrolled at two day care centers easily passed SARS-CoV-2 to at least 12 family members, one of whom ended up hospitalized.

So as millions of children head back to school, uncertainty as to their role in the spread of COVID-19 continues, Adalja said.

Source: Read Full Article

Christina Aguilera Gets ‘Cozy’ with Her Kids to Watch New Mulan: ‘A Beautiful Thing to Share’

Christina Aguilera had a Mulan movie night with her kids, popcorn and all!

As the new live-action remake debuted on Disney+ on Friday, the singer, 39, tweeted her experience watching the film for the first time alongside her two children, son Max Liron, 12, and daughter Summer Rain, 5.

"My kids know about #Mulan, but they haven’t seen the live action version yet. They’ve heard the music, they saw me recording it in the studio — so it’s a beautiful thing to share that with my children now," she wrote.

For the original 1998 animated Mulan, Aguilera sang the hit "Reflection," which she reimagined for the 2020 version, as well as recorded a new end-credits track titled "Loyal Brave True."

After prepping the popcorn — as well as candies like Red Hots, Sour Patch Kids, Raisinets and Hot Tamales, which the mom revealed were her kids' go-to movie treats — Aguilera began live-tweeting the viewing experience.

"Cozy blanket to snuggle up with kids?…✅ popcorn, kids snacks ✅ dim room, candles lit mood ✅ happy to be nowhere else in the world 😍 ✅," she wrote of her ideal at-home movie night checklist.

From the start of the film, Aguilera was hooked: "You guys, I’m like 1 minute in and even baby #Mulan is a badass."

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human interest stories

Aguilera tweeted that she is "honored to be a part" of Mulan, which was directed by Niki Caro and stars Yifei Liu as the titular heroine. "This movie is filled with such incredible female fire energy given both the star of the film and director are inspiring, strong women!! Evoking such presence and power," wrote the Grammy winner.

"@yifei_cc was just as flawlessly beautiful in person, as she is on screen. And working with #NikiCaro, the director of the film, was a joy, as she exuded a tender warmth and vision through the videos we shot together for LBT and Reflection," Aguilera wrote, sharing photos from the red carpet premiere of Mulan in March, before the film's theatrical release was delayed due to the pandemic.

Aguilera said the scene early in the film in which Mulan is glammed up with makeup to meet the matchmaker against her choosing is a favorite of hers — with newfound meaning since becoming a mother.

"Now as a mom seeing this, it’s funny. Reminds me of my daughter – how she resists me at all costs to fuss with her hair or wear any type of dress!" she tweeted. "But gives me a deeper sense of appreciation and acceptance for who she is and the unique, special person she feels comfortable to be."

Aguilera said she sees herself in the character of Mulan "in the sense that I’ve always been a Fighter – for and defending truth and meaning … even in the face of fear, self doubt and backlash."

Wrapping up the movie screening, Aguilera hummed a tune from the film in a brief clip and wrote: "That was so much fun. Thank you Disney for always being a special family to me. X"

The mom of two also revealed which Disney films are household favorites among her family: "Summer’s favorite movies right now are the Toy Story series. We particularly love to cozy up and watch old Disney classic cartoons — there’s one about 'Bongo the Circus Bear'… it’s on Disney+!"

Aguilera also answered a fan question about making the new music for Mulan, opening up about the emotional recording process.

"Recording the new Reflection was actually very emotional for me. I teared up many times (had to swallow the emotion because I’m not an accurate singer while crying)," she explained. "I realized & appreciated how much has changed from the original place & time I recorded this song."

"Back then, I was so nervous & young," continued Aguilera. "I wanted so badly to please & be heard, unsure of any future in the business. Now 20+ years of hard work later, I felt blessed & humbled to see my Grammys in view while recording in my own home studio. At my own pace & on my own terms."

Source: Read Full Article

Top Chef Winner Hosea Rosenberg Hosts Auction for Research on Daughter's Rare Disorder







"I think she knows something is a little off with her health, but we haven’t had this talk with her where we explain her bones are disappearing. That’s a pretty heavy thing to drop on anybody," Hosea says. "The best part right now is that she doesn’t seem to be in pain, or not very often. Some of the kids, the families we talk to, their kids are just in constant pain and we’re just praying that that is never the case for her, even if she ends up with deformities and loss of the use of her limbs, as long as she’s not in pain,  because pain is such a tough thing to manage."

Hosea says that while Sophie is doing well now, they don't want people to take the disorder lightly.

"I don’t want people to see pictures of her playing and think, ‘That doesn’t look bad, she’s holding an ice cream cone in that picture,' because she’s probably not going to be holding an ice cream cone in a year from now. That’s what so sad for Lauren and I," he says. "We want people to know she’s this amazing little girl and we want to keep her healthy, that’s our goal … We don’t want to wait until she can’t walk to ask for help."

The auction will take place all day on Aug. 15 until 11 p.m. ET. The bidding site can be found here. 

Source: Read Full Article

Bethenny Frankel and Daughter Bryn, 10, Wear Matching Tie-Dye Face Masks: 'The New Abnormal'




"Peanut, I love you so much. You have given me ten years of joy, inspiration, laughter and absolute love. You bring meaning to my life every day. You are such a sweet, loving and sunny person that shines light on everyone around you," Frankel captioned her birthday tribute to Bryn.

She continued: "You are loved. I wish for you health and happiness and that you continue to do what you love and what makes you happy every day and let your free spirit fly!"

Source: Read Full Article

Chuck Wicks and Wife Kasi Reveal Struggle with Male Infertility — and Share a Son Is on the Way





Chuck Wicks Marries Kasi Williams: All the Details from Their "Breathtaking" Cabo San Lucas Wedding

On March 25, Kasi underwent the embryo transfer as Chuck watched. "I see this incubator come in," he recalls, "and I just start sobbing because I knew inside that incubator was my little boy." Eight days later, Kasi and Chuck rejoiced when a home test showed a positive result. Two days after that, their fertility specialist confirmed the pregnancy.

Now, as they happily await the birth of their son, Chuck says he has come to terms with his medical condition. "It just happens," he says, "so that's the reassuring part." And as they've confided in family and friends over these past stressful months, they've discovered their issue is far more common than they'd imagined.

"We started hearing a lot of very similar stories that had successful outcomes," says Kasi, "so I think it gave us that hope that, okay, maybe this can work for us, too."

Having beaten the odds, both say they have found a blessing in their difficulties. "The fact that we had to go this route," Chuck says, "makes us realize even more how special having a child is."

For more from Chuck Wicks, pick up this week's issue of PEOPLE, on newsstands Friday.

Source: Read Full Article

Sean Lowe Doesn't Want 'More Than 4 Kids,' but Catherine Giudici Will Decide

The more, the merrier! Sean Lowe and his wife, Catherine Giudici, aren’t done expanding their family after welcoming their third child.

“We’ve talked about adopting a fourth child,” the former Bachelor, 36, recently told Us Weekly while promoting his Gillette partnership. “I don’t know if we’re done having biological children. I kind of hope that we are, because I think if we do end up adopting … that’d be a lot of kids.”

Since the Texas native doesn’t “want more than four” children, their future family plans are “still up in the air.”

The Bachelorette alum, who shares Samuel, 3, Isaiah, 2, and Mia, 5 months, with the Washington native, 34, went on to tell Us, “I imagine Catherine will make the ultimate decision, as I will have to defer to her. … At some point, I would like to get out of diapers, so that would be nice.”

Giudici gave birth to their daughter in December 2019, and her older bothers have had “a really easy adjustment.” Lowe explained, “The only thing that they get in trouble for is they love on her too much. Man, they just constantly want to give her kisses so sometimes I just have to tell them, ‘Guys, you’ve got to give her some air. She cannot breathe. You have to stop kissing her for a minute.’”

The little one is “a super happy baby,” the For the Right Reasons author told Us. “She just smiles and laughs all the time.”

When it comes to Mia’s latest milestones, she’s eating baby food, sitting up with assistance and becoming more aware of her surroundings.

“It’s fun to realize what she’s learning at a young age, and then to think about how she’s going to continue to transform into this little kid over the next six or 12 months or so,” Lowe gushed.

He and Giudici tied the knot in 2014 in California after meeting and falling in love on season 17 of The Bachelor.

Lowe has been working with Gillette to encourage dads to show off clean-shaven faces on social media with the hashtag #BabyFace as a commitment to develop strong bonds with their babies.

With reporting by Sarah Hearon

For access to all our exclusive celebrity videos and interviews – Subscribe on YouTube!

Source: Read Full Article

How Celeb Parents Are Educating Kids About Racism After George Floyd's Death

Open and honest conversations. Thomas Rhett, Katherine Heigl and more stars have shared the ways they’re educating their children about racism following George Floyd’s May 25 death.

“As the father of a black daughter and also two white daughters, I have struggled with what to say today,” the “Marry Me” singer, 30, captioned a Sunday, May 31, Instagram post featuring the Romans 12:9 Bible verse. “We have navigated forms of racism directly and while there is mostly overwhelming support and love for our family, sometimes there is just the opposite. Because of that fear, it can be a lot easier to choose silence, but today I’m choosing to speak.”

The Georgia native, who shares Willa, 4, Ada, 2, and Lennon, 3 months, with his wife, Lauren Akins, went on to write that he felt “heartbroken and angry” after watching the video of a police office killing Floyd pressing a knee into his neck for nearly nine minutes.

“I get scared when I think about my daughters and what kind of world they will be growing up in and how my JOB as a father is to show them how to lead with love in the face of hate,” the Grammy nominee added. “To know their worth and value as not only women but human beings.”

Rhett and Akins, also 30, adopted Willa from Uganda in May 2017, three months ahead of Ada’s birth.

“My heart has always been driven to [adoption],” the Live in Love author told Us Weekly exclusively the following year. “It just started as this calling in my life, to speak for these children who don’t have a voice. This is what I was really here to do. It lined up perfectly with my heart.”

Heigl, 41, who adopted her now-8-year-old daughter, Adalaide, in 2012 with her husband, Josh Kelley, shared that she has been struggling to tell her daughter about Floyd’s death.

“I can’t sleep,” the actress wrote via Instagram on May 31. “And when I do, I wake with a single thought in my head. How will I tell Adalaide? How will I explain the unexplainable? How can I protect her? How can I break a piece of her beautiful divine spirit to do so? I can’t sleep.”

Keep scrolling to see how more celebrity parents are having open dialogues with their children about racism.

In order to view the gallery, please allow Manage Cookies

For access to all our exclusive celebrity videos and interviews – Subscribe on YouTube!

Source: Read Full Article

These Children's Books Featuring Adopted/Foster Kids Will Make You Cry

Foster care adoptions reached a record high in 2020 — so why aren’t more kids and parents talking about fostering, or adoption in general, as a key process that has led to so many families being built? Of course, raising these topics with your kids isn’t easy; our words and even our tone can shape adopted and foster kids’ experiences and have a lasting impact on their mental and emotional health. But there are some amazing children’s books featuring adopted or foster kids that can help — teaching both kids and adults how to have thoughtful conversations about adoption and foster homes, and tackling subjects like grief, sadness, confusion, adaptation, and love.

That’s why we’ve gathered some of the most beautiful books out there that are suitable for young children and teens and which center on adoption and foster care. These are beautiful, relatable stories guaranteed to open up discussions and let kids know that they’re not alone in their feelings or experiences.

The Story of My Open Adoption

This heartwarming story, from solo mom by choice (and SheKnows writer!) Leah Campbell, is about Sammy Squirrel who is adopted at birth by the bunny family. A perfect option for teaching kids about the ever-more common open adoption process.

I’ve Loved You Since Forever

We love a lot of things about Hoda Kotb, and her children’s book about adoption is pretty high on the list. Kotb has two adopted daughters, Hope and Haley, whom we just know she has loved since forever. Although Kotb penned this book in response to adopting her eldest daughter, its themes of enduring love apply to any family, adopted or otherwise.

Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born

Many children have questions about their birth, but what happens when a child’s parents weren’t there to recount all of the details? Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born, written by Jamie Lee Curtis and illustrated by Laura Cornell, tells the story of one young girl who loves to hear about the night her parents brought her into their family. This sweet book acknowledges that adopted children have an array of different stories and reminds readers that their births — and all of the moments since — are valuable and cherished by their families.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries

The adoption and foster care processes can be stressful for children who don’t always understand why their situations are changing. Sadly, these experiences can lead to increased risk for poorer physical and mental health in the long run, including depression and anxiety, according to a study commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Too often, these children will internalize their feelings as they may not believe they can confide in a trusted adult.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries, written by Jill Seeney and illustrated by Rachel Fuller, tells the story of Morris the Mole who hides his worries from his loved ones. Throughout the book, Morris’ friends help him to understand that they care about his feelings and want to help him face his problems. With their assistance, Morris learns that while it’s normal to feel worried sometimes, he doesn’t have to experience any of his emotions alone.

Elliot

Placing a child into adoptive or foster care can be a complex and emotionally wrought decision for parents. Often, it can be just as confusing and challenging for children, who don’t understand why their lives are changing or why their parents may not be equipped to provide them with the care they need.

Elliot, written by adoptive mother Julie Pearson and illustrated by Manon Gauthier, is the story about a young rabbit whose parents believe another family could better care for him. Throughout the story, a social worker named Thomas helps Elliot navigate the foster care system in hopes of finding a family who can love and care for Elliot the way he deserves.

While the book has received a lot of positive recognition, some readers have said they felt the book seemed to place blame on Elliot for his changing circumstances because he cries and has outbursts. If you want to read this book with kids, you might want to explain that there’s nothing wrong with Elliot, or any other children in adoptive or foster care, and they are all worthy of love.

Maybe Days: A Book for Children in Foster Care

Maybe Days is a fantastic resource for children who have questions about why they are in foster care and how the process works. Author Jennifer Wilgocki breaks down what kids can expect from their parents, social workers, foster families, and more in ways they can easily digest, while illustrator Alissa Imre Geis’ drawings help younger children visualize various scenarios. The book, published by the American Psychological Association, also helps children get in touch with and better understand their feelings.

Picnic in the Park

No two families are the same, and that’s a reason to celebrate! Picnic in the Park introduces kids to different family dynamics — including families with LGBTQ parents, single parents, adoptive parents, and foster parents — so that they can grasp the beauty and importance of diversity at a young age. Together, author Joe Griffiths and illustrator Tony Pilgrim highlight that while families vary, the one thing they often share in common is love.

And Tango Makes Three

This delightful book from authors Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell and illustrator Henry Cole introduces children to adoption and LGBTQ couples by following penguins Roy and Silo on their journey to become parents. The story is based on the real Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins, who lived together at the Central Park Zoo and raised a penguin named Tango. (Sadly, Roy and Silo are no longer a couple in real life, which may be a discussion you want to have with kids another day.)

Sam’s Sister

Navigating the adoption process can be stressful, especially for those who arrange to have their children adopted by other parents. But the process can also be hard on the adopted child’s siblings, who may not understand why their parents don’t feel they can adequately care for another child. Sam’s Sister, written by Juliet C. Bond, LCSW and illustrated by Linda Hoffman Kimball, invites readers into Rosa’s world as she questions why her parents chose to find another family for her baby brother, Sam, and how she, ultimately, learns to accept a new family into her life.

The Great Gilly Hopkins

This award-winning classic from author Katherine Paterson is an excellent read for middle school-aged kids. Eleven-year-old Gilly Hopkins has moved between foster homes for most of her life. She’s smart, she’s driven, and now that she’s moved into her most recent house with the Trotters, Gilly has devised a plan to escape. The story is at once funny and heart-wrenching, as Gilly tries to reconnect with her biological mother and learns that love and acceptance sometimes come from the least expected places.

After kids have finished reading, they can watch the adapted film, which features Julia Stiles, Glenn Close, Kathy Bates, Octavia Spencer, and Sophie Nélisse.

The Story of Tracy Beaker

The Story of Tracy Beaker is the first in a series of books told from 10-year-old Tracy’s viewpoint written by Jacqueline Wilson. In this book, readers meet Tracy, a young girl who lives in a children’s residential home that she likes to call “The Dumping Ground.” As you can tell, Tracy isn’t too fond of her current situation.

To cope with her feelings, Tracy makes up elaborate stories and tales about her mother, whom she dreams will raise her again one day. While these tales help Tracy feel better in the short-term, she often finds herself feeling sad and angry with her current situation and doesn’t understand why she can’t fit into a conventional family. Throughout the book, Tracy warms up to new possibilities and learns to love herself.

Please note that this book does tackle issues like neglect, abuse, and violence. It may not be suitable for children under age nine.

Three Little Words: A Memoir

Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s memoir, Three Little Words, revisits her childhood experiences living in 14 different foster homes. In the book, Rhodes-Courter recounts her feelings of loneliness, her frustrations with the system, and the painful memories of her mother and abusive foster parents. The book, while at times heartbreaking and difficult to read, highlights Rhodes-Courter’s strengths as she discovered her self-worth and her voice.

This book is best suited for teens and adults.

A version of this story was originally published in May 2019.

For more great reads with your kids, check out these diverse children’s books featuring girls of color.






Source: Read Full Article

Kristin Cavallari: I'm Going 'Stir-Crazy' Parenting 3 Kids Amid Pandemic

A new normal. Kristin Cavallari is struggling to adjust to parenting three young children amid the coronavirus quarantine.

The Very Cavallari star, 33, opened up about the unexpected challenges she’s facing with her sons, Camden, 7, and Jaxon, 6, and 4-year-old daughter Saylor — whom she shares with her estranged husband, Jay Cutler — in an Instagram Live conversation with her stylist Dani Michelle on Saturday, May 16.

“I’m at my friend Justin’s house right now. We’ve been together for the entire quarantine time, literally from day 1,” Cavallari explained, referring to her pal Justin Anderson, with whom she and Cutler, 37, spent three weeks on vacation in the Bahamas in April.

“With my kids, it’s, like, ‘All right, what should we do today?’ We’ve maxed out every creative idea,” the Hills alum said. “I used to wake up at 5 a.m. every morning, work out and then I would get my kids ready for school, take them to school and go to the office. I haven’t set an alarm since all of this has been going on. It’s going to be really hard for me to get back into it. I don’t know that I can go back to that 5 a.m. lifestyle.”

Cavallari noted that she now has a later start to her mornings due to the quarantine and sharing a bed with her children.

“Because of my kids, I get up from anywhere between 6:30 and 8. I don’t normally let my kids sleep with me, but I’ve been rotating my kid for the last week,” she said. “It’s cute but those are the moments that will never be the same, we’ll never get those back. So in that sense, I’ve been trying to really enjoy that time with my kids.”

The Uncommon James designer has also undertaken the “tough” job of homeschooling — a feat that has been particularly difficult for her youngest son.

“I will tell you, the no school thing is tough,” Cavallari said. “With the boys, Jaxon will not listen to me. He refuses to do work. I’m like, ‘I can’t fight with you about doing schoolwork.’ It’s too hard.”

She added, “My kids are young so that’s nice. My boys are 7 and 6 so it’s not the end of the world if they’re not sitting here doing schoolwork every day but everyone’s going a little stir crazy because we really can’t go anywhere.”

Cavallari and the retired NFL quarterback announced their separation in April after seven years of marriage. Us Weekly confirmed on May 1 that the former couple settled on a custody agreement for their children, with each parent receiving 182.5 days a year.

After their split, Cutler penned a sweet Mother’s Day tribute to Cavallari on May 10.

“Happy Mother’s day to all the moms. These 3 little ones picked a good one,” Cutler wrote alongside a photo of Camden, Jaxon and Saylor via Instagram.

For access to all our exclusive celebrity videos and interviews – Subscribe on YouTube!

Source: Read Full Article