Calvin Harris Says His Heart Stopped in 2014: 'Interesting Year for Me'


Calvin Harris needed lifesaving help in 2014 after his heart stopped.

The DJ and singer revealed on Twitter that he had to have his heart “restarted” in the emergency room.

Harris retweeted a video on Tuesday night from his June 2014 performance at the Electric Daisy Festival, and added that it was an “interesting year.”

“Started with me knocking myself off number 1 in the UK and ended with my heart getting restarted in the ER…this sort of stuff happened in between,” he said.

Harris had hinted at his condition that year, but hadn’t previously said that his heart had stopped. Rather, the “Slide” singer said that he had “some heart problems” that needed to “be fixed” and were the reason why he canceled several shows.

He later clarified that he had an arrythmia, a heart condition that causes an irregular heartbeat and can lead to chest pain, fainting and dizziness.

That pushed him to give up drinking, he said on Twitter in 2018.

“Haven't drank in 4 years big man,” Harris told a fan who asked why he was abstaining from alcohol. "Aye things are a bit less fun but haven't had an arrhythmia since 2014.”

But Harris said he’s happy with the decision.

“The last thing I want to do is down 2 bottles of jack daniels a night, live on greggs pasties and sleep on an absolutely stinking bus all year, scream down a mic for 55 minutes and pretend to play a keyboard 5x a week those days are behind me son,” he added to the fan.

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Meet Jamie Otis and Doug Hehner's Son Hendrix Douglas: 'Beyond Thankful I Was Able to Have Him'




Jamie Otis and Doug Hehner Reveal They Changed Their Newborn Son's Name from Hayes to Hendrix

Afterwards, the labor-and-delivery nurse says she felt an immediate bond with Hendrix that she hadn't initially experienced with their daughter Henley "Gracie" Grace, who turns 3 in August.

"I felt so connected to him. I did not get that type of connection with Gracie," says Otis. "I birthed him in the corner, then literally walked to my bed with my placenta still inside me, him attached, and was able to start just doing skin-to-skin for six to seven hours."

Adds Hehner, "Jamie wouldn't let him go!"

While Gracie is still adjusting to having a new baby brother ("She tried to hold him and got a little scared," says Hehner), the Hot Marriage, Cool Parents co-hosts are confident she'll be a "protective" older sister.

"She's definitely going to be bossy. She bosses us around, and I think she's definitely going to be loving and nurturing as well," says Otis. "She always rocks her little baby dolls to sleep. She's going to be the best big sister."

After welcoming Gracie, the couple — who lost their first son, Johnathan Edward, at 17 weeks gestation in 2016 — struggled to conceive, experiencing a chemical pregnancy in 2018 and a miscarriage at 10 weeks along in 2019.

"I didn't think we were going to have any issues [getting pregnant] because we lost our first baby in the second trimester," says Otis. "I was almost thinking God wouldn't do that to us again. Then we had those two losses back to back, and I was like, 'Are we going to even be able to have a baby?' "

Just as they were about to visit a fertility specialist 18 months later, the couple discovered they were expecting.

"It's magical to see him. I just feel like [Johnathan's] spirit is with us with this little guy," says Otis. "I'm beyond thankful I was able to have him."

Married at First Sight: Couples' Cam premieres Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Lifetime.

For more on Jamie Otis and Doug Hehner's new bundle of joy, pick up the latest issue of PEOPLE, on newsstands Friday.

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Stop Shaming Russell Wilson for Being a Good Stepdad on Baby Future's Birthday

The saga between Ciara, husband Russell Wilson, and her ex-fiancé Future is something of a soap opera — at least that’s the way fans have often reacted to their public comments about each other. Which is fine; side with whichever famous person you like. But we’re not huge fans of what’s going on today, after all three took to social media to celebrate “Baby” Future’s sixth birthday.

People are riled up about Wilson’s post in particular, a super gushy note to his stepson: “You are my daily inspiration. My best friend…Full of Love, Joy, and Grace. I thank Jesus every day for who you are & being able to lead & guide you. Your future is forever endless and I pray you swim into every opportunity and obstacle in life with this much Love and Enthusiasm. Happy 6th Birthday Future! Daddy loves you!”

That’s a bit more effusive than the note Future wrote to his son on Twitter: “Happy Birthday FUTURE. Love u FOREVER twin.”

We highly doubt a 6-year-old is looking to social media for birthday messages from their parents. The little guy is doing just fine, getting extra family time during lockdown with his baby sister, stepdad, and mom Ciara, who’s currently pregnant with another baby boy.

Twitter, on the other hand, is on fire about these posts. Wilson calling himself Baby Future’s “Daddy” is the main issue, reminding us of the way Wilson appeared to have taken over that role quite early in the boy’s life. Future and Ciara split when their son was just a few months old, reportedly because of his cheating. By spring of 2015, she was making public appearances with Wilson, and soon the NFL pro was photographed bonding with Baby Future. Dad Future was none too happy with this.

“If I was a kid, and my mama had a dude pushing me, I would’ve jumped out the stroller and slapped the s— out of him,” the rapper told Power 105. “You never do that in our community. You don’t ever bring a man around your son. How you know this dude for a few months and you bring him around your kid? Who does that? Nobody does that.”

Thus began a back-and-forth between the three that has gone on for years and even involved Ciara suing her ex for slander and libel at one point. Last year, Future said things were cool between him and Wilson.

“I don’t have nothing against him, and I’m happy for them,” he said on his FREEBANDZ RADIO show, per People.

It’s in that context that we’re seeing this current birthday debate bubble up on Twitter. As Future fans question Wilson’s wording.

“You outta pocket,” @TreyDolo_ wrote.

“Russell is so phony and a clout chaser,” @harbor_msv said.  “Like stop trying to take subliminal shots at Baby Future’s dad. He was right about you. And where was this energy for Baby Sienna?”

But a vast majority of people on the platform are applauding Wilson for being such a loving stepfather.

“Anyone who thinks Russell is doing ‘too much’ by loving on Baby Future like he’s his own son seek help, Jesus, and therapy immediately,” Kaiah tweeted.

“Baby Future is super blessed,” Torie wrote. “Didn’t Future say he’s not able to be around all of his kids that much bc of his career? So baby future gets 3 successful parents and parents that are physically there. That’s cool to me.”

We hope that one day, when Baby Future is old enough to read social media, that this last statement is an accepted fact. Like all children, he deserves all the parental love available to him, regardless of what Twitter thinks.

Maybe one day, we’ll add Ciara and Future to this list of famous exes who are actually quite good at co-parenting.






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These Children's Books Featuring Adopted/Foster Kids Will Make You Cry

Foster care adoptions reached a record high in 2020 — so why aren’t more kids and parents talking about fostering, or adoption in general, as a key process that has led to so many families being built? Of course, raising these topics with your kids isn’t easy; our words and even our tone can shape adopted and foster kids’ experiences and have a lasting impact on their mental and emotional health. But there are some amazing children’s books featuring adopted or foster kids that can help — teaching both kids and adults how to have thoughtful conversations about adoption and foster homes, and tackling subjects like grief, sadness, confusion, adaptation, and love.

That’s why we’ve gathered some of the most beautiful books out there that are suitable for young children and teens and which center on adoption and foster care. These are beautiful, relatable stories guaranteed to open up discussions and let kids know that they’re not alone in their feelings or experiences.

The Story of My Open Adoption

This heartwarming story, from solo mom by choice (and SheKnows writer!) Leah Campbell, is about Sammy Squirrel who is adopted at birth by the bunny family. A perfect option for teaching kids about the ever-more common open adoption process.

I’ve Loved You Since Forever

We love a lot of things about Hoda Kotb, and her children’s book about adoption is pretty high on the list. Kotb has two adopted daughters, Hope and Haley, whom we just know she has loved since forever. Although Kotb penned this book in response to adopting her eldest daughter, its themes of enduring love apply to any family, adopted or otherwise.

Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born

Many children have questions about their birth, but what happens when a child’s parents weren’t there to recount all of the details? Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born, written by Jamie Lee Curtis and illustrated by Laura Cornell, tells the story of one young girl who loves to hear about the night her parents brought her into their family. This sweet book acknowledges that adopted children have an array of different stories and reminds readers that their births — and all of the moments since — are valuable and cherished by their families.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries

The adoption and foster care processes can be stressful for children who don’t always understand why their situations are changing. Sadly, these experiences can lead to increased risk for poorer physical and mental health in the long run, including depression and anxiety, according to a study commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Too often, these children will internalize their feelings as they may not believe they can confide in a trusted adult.

Morris and the Bundle of Worries, written by Jill Seeney and illustrated by Rachel Fuller, tells the story of Morris the Mole who hides his worries from his loved ones. Throughout the book, Morris’ friends help him to understand that they care about his feelings and want to help him face his problems. With their assistance, Morris learns that while it’s normal to feel worried sometimes, he doesn’t have to experience any of his emotions alone.

Elliot

Placing a child into adoptive or foster care can be a complex and emotionally wrought decision for parents. Often, it can be just as confusing and challenging for children, who don’t understand why their lives are changing or why their parents may not be equipped to provide them with the care they need.

Elliot, written by adoptive mother Julie Pearson and illustrated by Manon Gauthier, is the story about a young rabbit whose parents believe another family could better care for him. Throughout the story, a social worker named Thomas helps Elliot navigate the foster care system in hopes of finding a family who can love and care for Elliot the way he deserves.

While the book has received a lot of positive recognition, some readers have said they felt the book seemed to place blame on Elliot for his changing circumstances because he cries and has outbursts. If you want to read this book with kids, you might want to explain that there’s nothing wrong with Elliot, or any other children in adoptive or foster care, and they are all worthy of love.

Maybe Days: A Book for Children in Foster Care

Maybe Days is a fantastic resource for children who have questions about why they are in foster care and how the process works. Author Jennifer Wilgocki breaks down what kids can expect from their parents, social workers, foster families, and more in ways they can easily digest, while illustrator Alissa Imre Geis’ drawings help younger children visualize various scenarios. The book, published by the American Psychological Association, also helps children get in touch with and better understand their feelings.

Picnic in the Park

No two families are the same, and that’s a reason to celebrate! Picnic in the Park introduces kids to different family dynamics — including families with LGBTQ parents, single parents, adoptive parents, and foster parents — so that they can grasp the beauty and importance of diversity at a young age. Together, author Joe Griffiths and illustrator Tony Pilgrim highlight that while families vary, the one thing they often share in common is love.

And Tango Makes Three

This delightful book from authors Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell and illustrator Henry Cole introduces children to adoption and LGBTQ couples by following penguins Roy and Silo on their journey to become parents. The story is based on the real Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins, who lived together at the Central Park Zoo and raised a penguin named Tango. (Sadly, Roy and Silo are no longer a couple in real life, which may be a discussion you want to have with kids another day.)

Sam’s Sister

Navigating the adoption process can be stressful, especially for those who arrange to have their children adopted by other parents. But the process can also be hard on the adopted child’s siblings, who may not understand why their parents don’t feel they can adequately care for another child. Sam’s Sister, written by Juliet C. Bond, LCSW and illustrated by Linda Hoffman Kimball, invites readers into Rosa’s world as she questions why her parents chose to find another family for her baby brother, Sam, and how she, ultimately, learns to accept a new family into her life.

The Great Gilly Hopkins

This award-winning classic from author Katherine Paterson is an excellent read for middle school-aged kids. Eleven-year-old Gilly Hopkins has moved between foster homes for most of her life. She’s smart, she’s driven, and now that she’s moved into her most recent house with the Trotters, Gilly has devised a plan to escape. The story is at once funny and heart-wrenching, as Gilly tries to reconnect with her biological mother and learns that love and acceptance sometimes come from the least expected places.

After kids have finished reading, they can watch the adapted film, which features Julia Stiles, Glenn Close, Kathy Bates, Octavia Spencer, and Sophie Nélisse.

The Story of Tracy Beaker

The Story of Tracy Beaker is the first in a series of books told from 10-year-old Tracy’s viewpoint written by Jacqueline Wilson. In this book, readers meet Tracy, a young girl who lives in a children’s residential home that she likes to call “The Dumping Ground.” As you can tell, Tracy isn’t too fond of her current situation.

To cope with her feelings, Tracy makes up elaborate stories and tales about her mother, whom she dreams will raise her again one day. While these tales help Tracy feel better in the short-term, she often finds herself feeling sad and angry with her current situation and doesn’t understand why she can’t fit into a conventional family. Throughout the book, Tracy warms up to new possibilities and learns to love herself.

Please note that this book does tackle issues like neglect, abuse, and violence. It may not be suitable for children under age nine.

Three Little Words: A Memoir

Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s memoir, Three Little Words, revisits her childhood experiences living in 14 different foster homes. In the book, Rhodes-Courter recounts her feelings of loneliness, her frustrations with the system, and the painful memories of her mother and abusive foster parents. The book, while at times heartbreaking and difficult to read, highlights Rhodes-Courter’s strengths as she discovered her self-worth and her voice.

This book is best suited for teens and adults.

A version of this story was originally published in May 2019.

For more great reads with your kids, check out these diverse children’s books featuring girls of color.






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The cholera outbreak in a Victorian asylum that anticipated the coronavirus crisis in care homes

In 1849, a cholera epidemic that was sweeping through Britain reached West Riding Asylum in Wakefield, West Yorkshire. The deadly disease soon spread through the wards. Searching for the source of the outbreak, the consulting physician eventually settled on an individual who had been admitted while ill. The doctor described this unfortunate patient as the “unconscious messenger of death”.

Over a century and a half later, a care-home owner in Devon—alarmed by the fact that local care homes could admit residents with COVID-19—expressed his fears in a strikingly similar way. In early April 2020, the government issued guidelines that permitted taking in new residents even if sick. This, the care-home owner argued, would be “tantamount to importing death”.

Care homes are the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. Compared to all other settings, they have seen the biggest relative increase in deaths since the start of the outbreak. Most of the vast asylums of the Victorian era closed in the 20th century, as attitudes to treating mental health changed. Yet there are haunting parallels to be seen. Responses to, and experiences of, an outbreak of disease at one of these asylums back in the 19th century are disturbingly resonant today.

Cholera, an acute diarrhoeal disease, claimed the lives of more than 100 patients at West Riding Asylum in 1849. Such was the scale of the tragedy that the consulting physician, Thomas Giordani Wright, was commissioned by the asylum’s regulators to investigate and account for this disaster. The result, a report published in 1850, allows us to reconstruct the story of the cholera outbreak in minute detail. It is a story which foreshadows our own.

Cholera grips the asylum

The 19th century witnessed a huge expansion in the number of asylums in England.

In 1808, the British government passed legislation that allowed counties to collect and spend taxes on building asylums for those unable to pay for private treatment for mental illness. While most counties didn’t begin construction until they were forced to by further legislation in 1845. Yorkshire was quick off the mark. West Riding Asylum opened its doors in November 1818, initially with a view to accommodating 150 patients. By the middle of the century, extensions and a second building meant that more than 500 patients filled its wards.

Global cholera pandemics were a repeated problem throughout the 19th century. When the disease hit Britain in the autumn of 1848, Yorkshire was initially spared. But by September 1849, it had reached Wakefield. In his report, Wright conjures an image of the institution besieged, with “the spread of the pestilence all around the asylum”.

Some of those who had been attached to the asylum for a long time, like Wright himself, might have taken confidence from the fact it had escaped disaster during the previous cholera pandemic to hit England, in 1832. In 1849, sadly, it would not be so lucky.

In his report, Wright sought to understand how the disease had infiltrated the institution. He was doing so a few years before John Snow’s discovery that cholera was waterborne. Yet an inspection of both the drainage and ventilation did take place at West Riding Asylum; both were given a clean bill of health. Indeed, the inspectors—Messrs West and Dawson—were left to conclude that “the visitation, fatal as it has been to many, must be considered either as the immediate infliction of Divine Providence, or as dependent on causes of which nothing as yet is known”.

Wright looked elsewhere for causes. And in spite of his admission that “the laws of contamination are, in fact, little known”, he set his sights on one Elizabeth Fenton—his “unconscious messenger of death”.

The hunt for ‘patient zero’ begins

Elizabeth Fenton, a person with epilepsy, had been admitted to West Riding Asylum on 17 September 1849. She came from the nearby Gomersal Workhouse, where she had been for the past six years after her husband, a stonemason, abandoned her and their two children. Although her transfer had been recommended some weeks earlier, when the local official called at the workhouse to take her to the asylum, it took people at the workhouse by surprise.

Strokes of ill luck might, in part, explain the disastrous chain of events which followed. Two residents at the Gomersal Workhouse had died of cholera the night before Fenton was transferred; one of them normally slept in the same room as her. Yet authorities may have been lulled into a false sense of security by the fact that Fenton had not had direct contact with these residents before her transfer. She had suffered an unusually violent seizure that week, and so had spent most of her last nights in the workhouse restrained in a chair in another room. And the day before her transfer, she had been given a laxative to help relieve constipation. An early warning sign of cholera infection, diarrhoea, was thus concealed.

By the evening of her first day in the asylum, Fenton had developed symptoms. She was isolated immediately, as it had become clear that an outbreak was underway in Gomersal Workhouse. Her room was locked, and access restricted to a select few. But within a week, four more women had fallen ill. From that point on, the disease spread like wildfire through the female as well as male patient populations of the asylum.

Since the male cases were known not to have had any direct contact with any of the female cases, and the original four women were not even thought to have seen Fenton, Wright was stumped to explain whether the mode of transmission was “gaseous or solid, material or immaterial, vegetable or animal, magnetic or electrical”.

But he was firm in his conclusion that “infection was in some way brought into the asylum by that patient”. He cinched his argument by referring back to the 1832 pandemic, which the asylum had escaped unscathed. The only difference, he argued, between the two contexts was that no new patients from infected districts had been admitted in 1832, whereas in 1849, they had: Fenton. Case closed.

Yet Wright pursued this line of investigation further, with prosecutorial zeal, by turning his attention to Gomersal Workhouse. Fenton had brought the disease from Gomersal to West Riding Asylum—but how, in the first place, had it arrived at Gomersal?

From the medical officer at the workhouse, Wright learned that on 6 September “a dirty Irish woman, and her four children, were brought into the workhouse”. Showing signs of cholera, they had been taken to the workhouse hospital, where the mother had died just hours after arrival. One of her children died “a day or two after”; the exact timing was not thought worth recording. And just a day before Fenton was transferred to the asylum, two other women at the workhouse died.

As we know all too well from COVID-19, Aids and other recent pandemics, the hunt for the first person to fall ill—known as “patient zero”—collides with other vectors of stigmatisation. In the case of COVID-19, this has been clear above all in the horrifying rise in anti-Asian racism and xenophobia worldwide.

By 1849, the arrival in England of hundreds of thousands of Irish displaced by the Great Famine had contributed to wider anti-Irish sentiment, cementing a prejudicial association with poverty, dirt and disease. Forced into desperate living conditions, including dog kennels and cellars, this was an association which drew vicious strength from the staggeringly high death rates among the Irish during times of epidemic disease. As well as being epidemiologically unhelpful, Wright’s explicit identification of a local Irish patient zero fed into growing anti-Irish racism and a representation of the Irish as carriers, rather than fellow sufferers, of the disease.

The human cost rises

With cholera loose in the institution, the medical officers and attendants at West Riding Asylum tried to fight it using the full arsenal at their disposal: removal of patients to a separate cholera ward; improvements in diet—including “extra allowances of tea and brandy for supper”; fumigation of wards; and laundering of all bed sheets and clothes.

But as in the current pandemic, there was no cure, no vaccine. By the end of the year, more than 100 residents had died of cholera. Nineteen had died in just a single day towards the end of October.

In what Wright evidently considered to be a small mercy, the patients “generally did not appear to be much affected by fear, nor were they aware of the extent of the mortality”. But just as in today’s care homes, for the staff of the institution, it was traumatic. “It was a period of awful emergency, and the consternation of all was increased by the fearful mystery of the pestilence, the rapidity of its attack, without previous symptom or warning, and the little more than failure of every effort, to mitigate its course, or avert its progress.”

Amid this horror, it is unsurprising—particularly, unhappily, to us now—that residents were not the only fatalities. On November 4 1849, Mrs Reynolds, the chief nurse of the ward set up to tend to cholera cases, died of the disease.

In a separate report in November 1849, the director of the asylum quoted Reynolds as saying: “If I should die, I shall have the satisfaction on my death bed of knowing that I have done my duty.” Wright later wrote movingly of “her heroic and unremitting devotion to her duties” and “her kindness and humanity”.

Reynolds was not alone in being held up for praise. In 1851, the director of the asylum looked back on the service of all staff in these harrowing months “with gratitude and admiration”. And while noting that “no pecuniary recompense can adequately remunerate such services”, he drew attention to the princely sum of £264 which had been distributed among staff by the visiting justices, and a further—unspecified but “very large”—sum disbursed by a visiting magistrate (there to oversee Wright’s investigation) in a private capacity.

There is a poignant coda to this story, however. In contrast to the “substantial tokens of public approbation” the surviving officers and attendants had received, Wright used his report to draw attention to the sad inadequacy of Reynolds’s final resting place: a grave “without a mark to record her fate”. He pleaded with the magistrates and medical officers to make contributions so that her life and service could also be properly remembered.

Were lessons learnt?

Wright rounded off his report with a “lessons learnt” section—a genre with which we are likely to become all too familiar in the coming months and years.

While noting that changes to diet and fumigation appeared to bear some fruit, the lesson Wright was desperate to hammer home was the importance of “the precaution of not admitting into the asylum fresh patients from infected districts”. In that respect, his advice was much stricter than that issued by the Board of Health, the body charged with the control of epidemic disease, whose confident assurances—he suggested—had influenced people “to disregard all risk of communication”.

Wright concluded: “We have been fatally taught, that it is most important to use every possible vigilance to avert the approach of cholera; for, if it once find an entrance, no human resources are of much avail, to mitigate its intensity or abate its ravages.”

The colossal asylums of the 19th century may no longer be with us, but the parallels haunt us still. The risk to care homes was clear early in the contemporary crisis, according to chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance. And the vulnerability of institutionalised populations was not only foreseeable; doctors during the 1849 cholera outbreak tried to pass down lessons to future generations.

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Restart at the Corona-Hotspot West meat in Coesfeld

The Coronavirus pandemic in Germany medicine, politics, tourism and society firmly in its grip: More than four million people globally have become infected with the pathogen of Sars-CoV-2, 175.173 of them in Germany.

Restart at the Corona-Hotspot West meat in Coesfeld

After a forced break due to the many Corona-infections-Western meat starts on Tuesday with a test operation in the Coesfeld plant. In the first step, but still no pigs are to be slaughtered. The gradual start-up of the operation is accompanied by surveillance authorities. Used only for employees, you can have negative test results with the Coronavirus to be.

The district of Coesfeld had closed the plant in front of one and a half weeks temporarily, after numerous plant had infected the workers with the Coronavirus.

Also in lower Saxony is in operation in the district of Osnabrück, are employees of a Meat many Coronavirus infections have become known to the company West crown in Dissen, which is also operated by the battle company West meat together with Danish Crown. There, the district tested a total of 92 employees in a positive way.

On Monday, the operation rested thereupon. According to the district of approximately 2000 tonnes of meat may process. Thereafter, the operation for 14 days, it must close completely. A total of around 300 employees work in Dissen.

All further news about Corona-pandemic from Germany, Europe and the world, you will find in the News Ticker of FOCUS Online.  

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After Edeka and Netto Lidl now sells Designer masks by Van Laack

chip.de After Edeka and Netto Lidl now sells Designer masks by Van Laack

Most physicians have seen false-negative COVID-19 test results

(HealthDay)—Most physicians believe they have seen false-negative results for a COVID-19 diagnostic test, according to the results of a recent survey.

Sermo, a social platform for physicians, has been conducting a weekly international poll. In week 7, conducted from May 3 to 5, 2020, 4,476 physicians offered their perspectives regarding false negatives and reinfection rates.

According to the results of the recent poll, more than eight in 10 physicians report they have seen some degree of false-negative test results, including 96 percent of “supertreaters” in an intensive care unit setting (physicians who have treated more than 20 COVID-19 patients) who believe they have seen COVID-19 tests produce a false negative. Just over one-third of hospital-based respondents believe that more than 20 percent of the tests have produced false negatives. Relatedly, four in 10 physicians report seeing at least one false positive. Nearly one in 10 physicians believe they have seen a patient with a reinfection, with higher rates among physicians working internationally (5 percent saw reinfections in the United States versus 15 percent in Italy and Spain and 14 percent in China).

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58 days on the ventilator, connected to: Suddenly, a Corona begins to speak patient

The Coronavirus pandemic concerns also in Germany medicine, politics, tourism and society: More than four million people already infected with the pathogen of Sars-CoV-2, 174.301 of them in Germany. All the news about the Corona pandemic from Germany, Europe and the world, you will find in the News Ticker of FOCUS Online.

More News, services, and ideas to the Corona of a pandemic can be found on our overview of the portal

After 58 days on a ventilator, a 35-year-old woman who was suffering from Covid-19 has acquired a unit, the consciousness, and to speak in a surprisingly even begun. The “Sunday Times” reported. Still, the patient is no longer connected in Southampton General Hospital on the device, it needs to have but not mandatory. Their weaning from the ventilator should start but.

The senior physician for the intensive care of the hospital, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, said that the patient still have a long way to recovery, as well as a long rehabilitation in front of him. “She practically said no muscle strength – barely enough to Breathe,” the doctor of the “Sunday Times” and also explained why that is so. “If you connected to a respirator or in intensive care is to build the skeletal muscles with the time.” Other problems, like a weakened diaphragm, would then occur.

Corona-patient starts after 58 days on mechanical ventilation to speak suddenly

Gupta was surprised for a number of reasons, and thrilled that the woman could suddenly communicate. Suddenly she could speak, while she was still too weak to lift a Finger or write a file, reported doctor.

Because many studies assume a high mortality of up to 90 percent for Covid-19-patients in intensive care or ventilation, the progress of the patient, all the more remarkable.

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Kristin Cavallari: I'm Going 'Stir-Crazy' Parenting 3 Kids Amid Pandemic

A new normal. Kristin Cavallari is struggling to adjust to parenting three young children amid the coronavirus quarantine.

The Very Cavallari star, 33, opened up about the unexpected challenges she’s facing with her sons, Camden, 7, and Jaxon, 6, and 4-year-old daughter Saylor — whom she shares with her estranged husband, Jay Cutler — in an Instagram Live conversation with her stylist Dani Michelle on Saturday, May 16.

“I’m at my friend Justin’s house right now. We’ve been together for the entire quarantine time, literally from day 1,” Cavallari explained, referring to her pal Justin Anderson, with whom she and Cutler, 37, spent three weeks on vacation in the Bahamas in April.

“With my kids, it’s, like, ‘All right, what should we do today?’ We’ve maxed out every creative idea,” the Hills alum said. “I used to wake up at 5 a.m. every morning, work out and then I would get my kids ready for school, take them to school and go to the office. I haven’t set an alarm since all of this has been going on. It’s going to be really hard for me to get back into it. I don’t know that I can go back to that 5 a.m. lifestyle.”

Cavallari noted that she now has a later start to her mornings due to the quarantine and sharing a bed with her children.

“Because of my kids, I get up from anywhere between 6:30 and 8. I don’t normally let my kids sleep with me, but I’ve been rotating my kid for the last week,” she said. “It’s cute but those are the moments that will never be the same, we’ll never get those back. So in that sense, I’ve been trying to really enjoy that time with my kids.”

The Uncommon James designer has also undertaken the “tough” job of homeschooling — a feat that has been particularly difficult for her youngest son.

“I will tell you, the no school thing is tough,” Cavallari said. “With the boys, Jaxon will not listen to me. He refuses to do work. I’m like, ‘I can’t fight with you about doing schoolwork.’ It’s too hard.”

She added, “My kids are young so that’s nice. My boys are 7 and 6 so it’s not the end of the world if they’re not sitting here doing schoolwork every day but everyone’s going a little stir crazy because we really can’t go anywhere.”

Cavallari and the retired NFL quarterback announced their separation in April after seven years of marriage. Us Weekly confirmed on May 1 that the former couple settled on a custody agreement for their children, with each parent receiving 182.5 days a year.

After their split, Cutler penned a sweet Mother’s Day tribute to Cavallari on May 10.

“Happy Mother’s day to all the moms. These 3 little ones picked a good one,” Cutler wrote alongside a photo of Camden, Jaxon and Saylor via Instagram.

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Alec and Hilaria Baldwin's Sweetest Moments With Their Kids: Family Album

The Baldwinitos! Alec Baldwin and Hilaria Baldwin love life with their four little ones.

The couple wed in June 2012 in New York City and welcomed their first child, a baby girl, to the world the following year.

“We are overjoyed to announce the birth of our daughter Carmen Gabriela,” the Living Clearly Method author tweeted in August 2013. “She is absolutely perfect.”

Before the little one’s 2nd birthday, the “Mom Brain” podcast cohost announced that she was expecting baby No. 2 with the Saturday Night Live alum. (The actor previously welcomed his daughter Ireland Baldwin with his then-wife, Kim Basinger, in 1995).

The fitness guru shared the news with her yoga posture of the day — tadasana. The Spain native posed with her shirt pulled up at the beach while Alec knelt in the sand, holding Carmen. The toddler kissed her mom’s bare stomach in the January 2015 Instagram upload.

Rafael arrived five months later, followed by Leonardo and Romeo in September 2016 and May 2018, respectively.

Hilaria and the Emmy winner have been vocal about their plans for baby No. 5, but suffered two pregnancy losses within one year.

“We are so lucky with our 4 healthy babies — and we will never lose sight of this,” the Yoga Vida cofounder captioned her Instagram announcement following the second in November 2019. “I told [Carmen] that this baby isn’t going to come after all, but we will try very hard to give her a little sister another time.”

With such a big brood at home, the former yoga instructor has learned how to settle conflicts between her kids. “They do fight, obviously,” Hilaria told Us Weekly exclusively in March 2020. “I just have a big rule that we’re a good team. We have that written on our wedding rings in Spanish that we’re a good team. Anytime there is conflict, you’re never allowed to hurt anyone and you have to use your words. You can’t use mean words.”

Keep scrolling to see her and Alec’s best moments with their big brood, from Halloween costumes to beach trips.

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