Pink Calls Coronavirus Battle with Son Jameson 'Most Physically and Emotionally Challenging Experience'

Pink is opening up about her experience battling the coronavirus alongside her 3-year-old son, Jameson.

Ahead of the Mother’s Day holiday on Sunday, the singer, 40, wrote an essay for NBC News reflecting on the current coronavirus pandemic and what it means for mothers around the world.

“Mother’s Day is this weekend and I have been reflecting on the wonderful, yet challenging gift of time that life in COVID-19 quarantine has meant for me and my children,” she begins in the essay. “To be a mom, a teacher, a cook, a confidant, and a badass dream chaser all at once is no small feat. Mamas everywhere, you are doing amazing.”

The mom of two also details how parents are currently “defining a new normal” for their children, adding that “the virus knows no boundaries” and parts of the world may be just beginning to feel its effects.


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Pink, who revealed in early April that she and her son battled the coronavirus, also reflects her own experience with the respiratory illness in her essay.

“Battling COVID-19 along with my 3-year-old son was the most physically and emotionally challenging experience I have gone through as a mother,” Pink writes. “Weeks after receiving our test results, my son was still ill and feverish. It was a terrifying time, not knowing what might come next.”

The star adds, “But our story is not unique; there are mothers all over America, and the world, that are facing this same uncertainty every single day. Not every family, especially those living on reservations, or in refugee camps, slums, or favelas, are able to practice social distancing. In many parts of the world it can take hours just to access water, and even then, soap may be an impossible luxury.”

Shortly after revealing her and Jameson’s diagnosis on Instagram, Pink said that although they were both feeling better, the young toddler “had the worst of it.”

“Jameson has been really, really sick,” she said during an Instagram Live chat with her friend and author Jen Pastiloff on April 4. “I’ve kept a journal of his symptoms for the past three weeks and mine as well. He still, three weeks later, has a 100 temperature. It’s been a rollercoaster for both of us, but Carey and Willow have been perfectly fine.”

In her essay, published on Saturday, the “Beautiful Trauma” singer also urges fans to “put ourselves in the shoes of moms around the globe and consider doing what we can to help keep their babies safe.”

“How can we partake in ensuring their access to the basic human rights that so many of us are afforded each and every day?” she asks.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments. PEOPLE has partnered with GoFundMe to raise money for the COVID-19 Relief Fund, a GoFundMe.org fundraiser to support everything from frontline responders to families in need, as well as organizations helping communities. For more information or to donate, click here.

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Individualized mosaics of microbial strains transfer from the maternal to the infant gut

Microbial communities in the intestine—also known as the gut microbiome—are vital for human digestion, metabolism and resistance to colonization by pathogens. The gut microbiome composition in infants and toddlers changes extensively in the first three years of life. But where do those microbes come from in the first place?

Scientists have long been able to analyze the gut microbiome at the level of the 500 to 1,000 different bacterial species that mainly have a beneficial influence; only more recently have they been able to identify individual strains within a single species using powerful genomic tools and supercomputers that analyze massive amounts of genetic data.

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham now have used their microbiome “fingerprint” method to report that an individualized mosaic of microbial strains is transmitted to the infant gut microbiome from a mother giving birth through vaginal delivery. They detailed this transmission by analyzing existing metagenomic databases of fecal samples from mother-infant pairs, as well as analyzing mouse dam and pup transmission in a germ-free, or gnotobiotic, mouse model at UAB, where the dams were inoculated with human fecal microbes.

“The results of our analysis demonstrate that multiple strains of maternal microbes—some that are not abundant in the maternal fecal community—can be transmitted during birth to establish a diverse infant gut microbial community,” said Casey Morrow, Ph.D., professor emeritus in UAB’s Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology. “Our analysis provides new insights into the origin of microbial strains in the complex infant microbial community.”

The study used a strain-tracking bioinformatics tool previously developed at UAB, called Window-based Single-nucleotide-variant Similarity, or WSS. Hyunmin Koo, Ph.D., UAB Department of Genetics and Genomics Core, led the informatics analysis. The gnotobiotic mouse model studies were led by Braden McFarland, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UAB Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology.

Morrow and colleagues have used this microbe fingerprint tool in several previous strain-tracking studies. In 2017, they found that fecal donor microbes—used to treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections—remained in recipients for months or years after fecal transplants. In 2018, they showed that changes in the upper gastrointestinal tract through obesity surgery led to the emergence of new strains of microbes. In 2019, they analyzed the stability of new strains in individuals after antibiotic treatments, and earlier this year, they found that adult twins, ages 36 to 80 years old, shared a certain strain or strains between each pair for periods of years, and even decades, after they began living apart from each other.

In the current study, several individual-specific patterns of microbial strain-sharing were found between mothers and infants. Three mother-infant pairs showed only related strains, while a dozen other infants of mother-infant pairs contained a mosaic of maternal-related and unrelated microbes. It could be that the unrelated strains came from the mother, but they had not been the dominant strain of that species in the mother, and so had not been detected.

Indeed, in a second study using a dataset from nine women taken at different times in their pregnancies showed that strain variations in individual species occurred in seven of the women.

To further define the source of the unrelated strains, a mouse model was used to look at transmission from dam to pup in the absence of environmental microbes. Five different females were given transplants of different human fecal matter to create five unique humanized-microbiome mice, which were bred with gnotobiotic males. The researchers then analyzed the strains found in the human donors, the mouse dams and their mouse pups. They found four different patterns: 1) The pup’s strain of a particular species was related to the dam’s strain; 2) The pup’s strain was related to both the dam’s strain and the human donor’s strain; 3) The pup’s strain was related to the human donor’s strain, but not to the dam’s strain; and, importantly, 4) No related strains for a particular species were found between the pup, the dam and the human donor. Since these animals were bred and raised in germ-free conditions, the unrelated strains in the pups came from minor, undetected strains in the dams.

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Heart attack: Worst food group which significantly raises your risk

Heart attacks occur when the supply of blood to the heart is suddenly blocked. A lack of blood to the heart may seriously damage the heart muscle and can prove deadly. When it comes to one’s diet, aiming for five portions of fruits and vegetables will help to keep the heart healthy. When it comes to a food which does the opposite, there is one that should be avoided as much as possible.

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When a heart attack occurs, it can disrupt a person’s normal heart rhythm, potentially stopping it altogether.

When the heart stops getting a supply of blood during a heart attack, some of the tissue can die.

This can weaken the heart and later cause life-threatening conditions such as heart failure.

Heart attacks can affect the heart valve and cause leaks.

Keeping healthy and active are some of the best methods to reduce having a heart attack and spotting early signs is also crucial.

When it comes to being healthy and reducing your risk of serious conditions, eating bacon should be avoided.

More than half of bacon’s calories come from saturated fat.

Saturated fat raises the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or bad cholesterol and boost the chance of a heart attack or stroke.

Bacon also contains high amounts of salt which bumps up the blood pressure and makes the heart work harder.

High amounts of sodium can lead to stroke, heart disease and heart failure.

Bacon’s added preservatives are linked to these issues as well.

A study of almost 30,000 people followed for up to three decades found those who regularly consumed processed meat such as bacon were more prone to premature death.

In particular, having red or processed meat every seven days was linked to a three percent to seven percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Senior author of the study, Norrina Allen, professor of preventative medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago said: “It is a small difference, but it’s worth trying to reduce red meat and processed meat like pepperoni and deli meats.

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Red meat includes beef, lamb, pork, veal and venison.

Processed is bacon, sausages, hot dogs, salami and corned beef.

The study published in JAMA Internal Medicine included self-reported diets over the previous year or month of 29,682 men and women with an average age of 53.

Lead author Dr Victor Zhong said: “Modifying intake of these animal protein foods may be an important strategy to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and premature death at a population level.”

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute said: “The major risk factors for a heart attack include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, overweight and obesity, an unhealthy diet, lack of routine physical activity, high blood sugar due to insulin resistance or diabetes.

“Some of these risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar tend to occur together.

“When they do, it’s called metabolic syndrome. In general, a person who has metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop heart disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone who doesn’t have metabolic syndrome.”

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How does the brain link events to form a memory? Study reveals unexpected mental processes

A woman walking down the street hears a bang. Several moments later she discovers her boyfriend, who had been walking ahead of her, has been shot. A month later, the woman checks into the emergency room. The noises made by garbage trucks, she says, are causing panic attacks. Her brain had formed a deep, lasting connection between loud sounds and the devastating sight she witnessed.

This story, relayed by clinical psychiatrist and co-author of a new study Mohsin Ahmed, MD, Ph.D., is a powerful example of the brain’s powerful ability to remember and connect events separated in time. And now, in that new study in mice published today in Neuron, scientists at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute have shed light on how the brain can form such enduring links.

The scientists uncovered a surprising mechanism by which the hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory, builds bridges across time: by firing off bursts of activity that seem random, but in fact make up a complex pattern that, over time, help the brain learn associations. By revealing the underlying circuitry behind associative learning, the findings lay the foundation for a better understanding of anxiety and trauma- and stressor-related disorders, such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorders, in which a seemingly neutral event can elicit a negative response.

“We know that the hippocampus is important in forms of learning that involve linking two events that happen even up to 10 to 30 seconds apart,” said Attila Losonczy, MD, Ph.D., a principal investigator at Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and the paper’s co-senior author. “This ability is a key to survival, but the mechanisms behind it have proven elusive. With today’s study in mice, we have mapped the complex calculations the brain undertakes in order to link distinct events that are separated in time.”

The hippocampus—a small, seahorse-shaped region buried deep in the brain—is an important headquarters for learning and memory. Previous experiments in mice showed that disruption to the hippocampus leaves the animals with trouble learning to associate two events separated by tens of seconds.

“The prevailing view has been that cells in the hippocampus keep up a level of persistent activity to associate such events,” said Dr. Ahmed, an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, and co-first author of today’s study. “Turning these cells off would thus disrupt learning.”

To test this traditional view, the researchers imaged parts of the hippocampus of mice as the animals were exposed to two different stimuli: a neutral sound followed by a small but unpleasant puff of air. A fifteen-second delay separated the two events. The scientists repeated this experiment across several trials. Over time, the mice learned to associate the tone with the soon-to-follow puff of air. Using advanced two-photon microscopy and functional calcium imaging, they recorded the activity of thousands of neurons, a type of brain cell, in the animals’ hippocampus simultaneously over the course of each trial for many days.

“With this approach, we could mimic, albeit in a simpler way, the process our own brains undergo when we learn to connect two events,” said Dr. Losonczy, who is also a professor of neuroscience at Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.

To make sense of the information they collected, the researchers teamed up with computational neuroscientists who develop powerful mathematical tools to analyze vast amounts of experimental data.

“We expected to see repetitive, continuous neural activity that persisted during the fifteen-second gap, an indication of the hippocampus at work linking the auditory tone and the air puff,” said computational neuroscientist Stefano Fusi, Ph.D., a principal investigator at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute and the paper’s co-senior author. “But when we began to analyze the data, we saw no such activity.”

Instead, the neural activity recorded during the fifteen-second time gap was sparse. Only a small number of neurons fired, and they did so seemingly at random. This sporadic activity looked distinctly different from the continuous activity that the brain displays during other learning and memory tasks, like memorizing a phone number.

“The activity appears to come in fits and bursts at intermittent and random time periods throughout the task,” said James Priestley, a doctoral candidate co-mentored by Drs. Losonczy and Fusi at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute and the paper’s co-first author. “To understand activity, we had to shift the way we analyzed data and use tools designed to make sense of random processes.”

Ultimately, the researchers discovered a pattern in the randomness: a style of mental computing that seems to be a remarkably efficient way that neurons store information. Instead of communicating with each other constantly, the neurons save energy—perhaps by encoding information in the connections between cells, called synapses, rather than through the electrical activity of the cells.

“We were happy to see that the brain doesn’t maintain ongoing activity over all these seconds because, metabolically, that’s not the most efficient way to store information,” said Dr. Fusi, who is also a professor of neuroscience at Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. “The brain seems to have a more efficient way to build this bridge, which we suspect may involve changing the strength of the synapses.”

In addition to helping to map the circuitry involved in associative learning, these findings also provide a starting point to more deeply explore disorders involving dysfunctions in associative memory, such as panic and pos-ttraumatic stress disorder.

“While our study does not explicitly model the clinical syndromes of either of these disorders, it can be immensely informative,” said Dr. Ahmed, who is also a member of the Losonczy lab at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute. “For example, it can help us to model some aspects of what may be happening in the brain when patients experience a fearful association between two events that would, to someone else, not elicit fright or panic.”

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COVID-19 activity levels begin to rebound

Activity levels during lockdown in Britain’s busiest regions including Greater London, Greater Manchester and the West Midlands have begun to rebound following successive week-by-week declines, according to new UCL analysis of geographical data.

Combining in-app mobile data with demographic indicators, the researchers found that activity levels—defined as the number of unique mobile devices used per hour in each study area—declined during the first five weeks of lockdown, but have ticked up since the 19th April.

Professor James Cheshire, UCL Geography and deputy director of the ESRC Consumer Data Research Centre, said: “Our analysis suggests that people have been adhering to the lockdown rules and taking them very seriously over the first month or so. But by early May, we’ve started to see a shift with more activity in recent days. It may be that people have started to increase their movements in anticipation of the government announcement expected this weekend for easing lockdown.”

The data was supplied by Huq Industries and the UCL analysis shows that across the busiest UK regions between 16-22 March, there was roughly a 20% decline in activity compared to the week before lockdown; by 23-30 March, there was a 36% decline; and by the 13th of April, almost a 50% decline in activity. Activity began to increase from the 20th April and is now back to roughly 60% of pre-lockdown levels.

London had seen the biggest reduction in activity, with levels down 70% between the 13th and 19th April rebounding slightly to a smaller reduction of 63% in the week ending 3rd May. The week of the 13th was also quietest for Greater Manchester and the West Midlands with 46% and 50% reductions in normal activity respectively. Both have seen a rise in activity levels and now report reductions of only 30% compared to those pre-lockdown.

Regional activity levels have declined the most in areas dominated by workplaces of professionals, the financial sector, leisure and tourism. Today activity levels are highest in areas dominated by routine occupations, construction, domestic workers, manual helpers, and others employed in the health sectors.

Professor Cheshire said: “The findings further highlight a divide between those in jobs that can be done from home and those with jobs that must be carried out on site, with activity levels suggesting that those working in financial services in particular are in a better position to work remotely. This will have important implications for transport planning as operators seek staggered working hours mixed with homeworking where possible to reduce peak demand.”

The research also reveals for the first time that traditional high streets and local shopping areas have seen lower relative declines in activity compared to major centers and out of town areas.

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A new plant-based system for the mass production of allergens for immunotherapy

Allergies can significantly affect health and quality of life. While allergen immunotherapy provides long-lasting therapeutic relief to people suffering from environmental allergies, the therapy can last several years and requires large amounts of allergen. Now, researchers from the University of Tsukuba developed a novel system that enables the mass production of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 in plant leaves in just a matter of days. In a new study published in Frontiers in Plant Science, they showed that their system not only produces large amounts of Bet v 1, but the purified protein was also highly reactive towards the IgE antibodies in sera from individuals with birch pollen allergy.

“The idea of allergen immunotherapy is to desensitize the body’s response to the allergen by exposing patients to it in gradually increasing amounts,” says corresponding author of the study Professor Kenji Miura. “Because a significant drawback is the difficult, expensive and low-yield production of allergens, our goal was to develop a new system that allows for the rapid and massive production of allergens that can be used in the clinical setting.”

To achieve their goal, the researchers turned to their previously established “Tsukuba system,” which makes use of a method called agroinfiltration. They first introduced the gene for Bet v 1 into a specific type of bacteria called Agrobacterium tumefaciens and let them grow. They then immersed leaves of the plant Nicotiana benthamiana into the bacterial solution to bring the bacteria into close contact with the plant, so the bacteria could transfer the Bet v 1 gene to plant cells, which in turn started producing the protein. To test the quality of their product, the researchers also produced the protein in Brevibacillus brevis, which is a standard bacterial host for protein production.

“We were able to purify 1.2mg of Bet v 1 protein from 1g leaves in just 5 days,” explains Professor Miura. “This is a relatively large amount that is otherwise difficult to achieve using standard methods. Our next goal was to test whether our protein was immunogenic, which is a prerequisite for immunotherapy.”

The researchers isolated sera from individuals with birch pollen allergy and mixed them with Bet v 1 protein purified from plants and bacteria. In both cases, the researchers were able to show that Bet v 1-specific IgE from the patients’ sera, which is the antibody causing the allergy, was strongly reactive to their proteins.

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Can't sleep? Try these acupressure techniques to help you drift off

When you’re tossing and turning and sleep just won’t come, you’ll try anything – fancy pillow sprays, herbal remedies, hypnotherapy apps, desperately ringing up a pal and asking them to tell you a bedtime story.

In these dire situations, it’s worth giving acupressure a go, mostly because it’s free, easy to do, and if it doesn’t work you haven’t lost anything.

And actually, it just might work. Then you’ll get to drift off into rest and everything will be dreamy.

We chatted to Renata Nunes, a physiotherapist, massage therapist, and acupuncturist, who shared her guide to simple acupressure techniques you can do on yourself at home to help you get some sleep.

‘Chinese medicine understands insomnia as disharmony between Yin and Yang,’ Renata explains.

‘The energy between Yin and Yang must be harmonious and must flow into each other in a daily cycle. Yang energy should flow during the day and Yin energy at night.

‘Yang is brilliant energy, the sun, the day, occurs intensely, Yin is passive energy, at night, it occurs in a timid way. Someone with insomnia has a greater Yang tendency than Yin.

‘Treatment must find the balance between Yin and Yang, fire and water. In this case, fire is represented by the heart and water is represented by the kidney.

‘The ideal would be to make an assessment to check the disharmonies of each patient. However, in this time of isolation, we can work with some points to help calm the mind and sleep better.’

Don’t get put off by the Yin and Yang talk – you don’t necessarily need to buy into all of that to see benefits from acupressure techniques.

Ready? Let’s try these.

Yintang – to calm the mind

Yintang describes the point right between the eyebrows.

Renata says: ‘Make a very gentle massage between the inner ends of the two eyebrows in a circular motion clockwise.

Also you can tap the point with your fingertip.

‘As you apply the pressure allow all the muscles of your forehead to relax. This is a good point to calm the mind and insomnia.’

GV 20 – to dispel negative thoughts

This is at the top of the head, in the middle of the line that connects the apex of the two ears. You can press the point down and back.

Try making circular movements counterclockwise direction.

Renata says this technique can also help to relieve headaches.

Heart 7

Applying pressure to this area is said to help relieve insomnia, irritability, and chest pain.

‘Draw a vertical line between your fourth and fifth finger and stop at the crease of the wrist,’ Renata explains. ‘The point is at the height of the wrist crease next to the tendon.

‘You can press the point and make circular movements in a clockwise direction. Also, you can rub the whole wrist.’

Kidney 6 – to nourish kidney Yin

This is the spot on the inner side of the foot, in the depression below the ankle .

Renata recommends pressing this point, making circular movements in a clockwise direction, and tapping it, to help ‘calm the mind, open the chest, and invigorate the kidney’.

Do you have a story to share? Get in touch by emailing [email protected]

Share your views in the comments section below.

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We may be able to eliminate coronavirus, but we’ll probably never eradicate it. Here’s the difference

Compared to many other countries around the world, Australia and New Zealand have done an exceptional job controlling COVID-19.

As of May 7, there were 794 active cases of COVID-19 in Australia. Only 62 were in hospital.

The situation in New Zealand is similar, with 136 active cases, only two of whom are in hospital.

If we continue on this path, could we eliminate COVID-19 from Australia and New Zealand?

Control –> elimination –> eradication

In order to answer this question, we first to need to understand what elimination means in the context of disease, and how it differs from control and eradication.

Disease control is when we see a reduction in disease incidence and prevalence (new cases and current cases) as a result of public health measures. The reduction does not mean to zero cases, but rather to an acceptable level.

Unfortunately, there’s no consensus on what is acceptable. It can differ from disease to disease and from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

As an example, there were only 81 cases of measles reported in Australia in 2017. Measles is considered under control in Australia.

Conversely, measles is not regarded as controlled in New Zealand, where there was an outbreak in 2019. From January 1, 2019, to February 21, 2020, New Zealand recorded 2,194 measles cases.

For disease elimination, there must be zero new cases of the disease in a defined geographic area. There is no defined time period this needs to be sustained for—it usually depends on the incubation period of the disease (the time between being exposed to the virus and the onset of symptoms).

For example, the South Australian government is looking for 28 days of no new coronavirus cases (twice the incubation period of COVID-19) before they will consider it eliminated.

Even when a disease has been eliminated, we continue intervention measures such as border controls and surveillance testing to ensure it doesn’t come back.

For example, in Australia, we have successfully eliminated rubella (German measles). But we maintain an immunization schedule and disease surveillance program.

Finally, disease eradication is when there is zero incidence worldwide of a disease following deliberate efforts to get rid of it. In this scenario, we no longer need intervention measures.

Only two infectious diseases have been declared eradicated by the World Health Organisation – smallpox in 1980 and rinderpest (a disease in cattle caused by the paramyxovirus) in 2011.

Polio is close to eradication with only 539 cases reported worldwide in 2019.

Guinea worm disease is also close with a total of just 19 human cases from January to June 2019 across two African countries.

What stage are we at with COVID-19?

In Australia and New Zealand we currently have COVID-19 under control.

Importantly, in Australia, the effective reproduction number (Reff) is close to zero. Estimates of Reff come from mathematical modelling, which has not been published for New Zealand, but the Reff is likely to be close to zero in New Zealand too.

The Reff is the average number of people each infected person infects. So a Reff of 2 means on average, each person with COVID-19 infects two others.

If the Reff is greater than 1 the epidemic continues; if the Reff is equal to 1 it becomes endemic (that is, it grumbles along on a permanent basis); and if the Reff is lower than 1, the epidemic dies out.

So we could be on the way to elimination.

In both Australia and New Zealand we have found almost all of the imported cases, quarantined them, and undertaken contact tracing. Based on extensive community testing, there also appear to be very few community-acquired cases.

The next step in both countries will be sentinel surveillance, where random testing is carried out in selected groups. Hopefully in time these results will be able to show us COVID-19 has been eliminated.

It’s unlikely COVID-19 will ever be eradicated

To be eradicated, a disease needs to be both preventable and treatable. At the moment, we neither have anything to prevent COVID-19 (such as a vaccine) nor any proven treatments (such as antivirals).

Even if a vaccine does become available, SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) easily mutates. So we would be in a situation like we are with influenza, where we need annual vaccinations targeting the circulating strains.

The other factor making COVID-19 very difficult if not impossible to eradicate is the fact many infected people have few or no symptoms, and people could still be infectious even with no symptoms. This makes case detection very difficult.

At least with smallpox, it was easy to see whether someone was infected, as their body was covered in pustules (fluid-containing swellings).

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Finally! You Can Get Adult & Kids Face Masks at Old Navy

Unless you’ve been lucky enough to have sewing skills and spare breathable fabric lying around the house, you might be in the same boat as so many of us, still struggling to find good masks for our children and ourselves. Today we have good news for you: Old Navy has is now selling super cute, stylish kids masks and adult masks, at rather incredible prices.

The masks are in the kind of preppy and preppy prints Old Navy has always used for its shorts and pajamas. There are plaids, checks, paisleys, anchors, tropical motifs, stripes, polka dots, and the occasional Warhol-esque banana. You can’t choose, however. The kids masks and adult masks are sold in “surprise packs” of five for $12.50.

All the masks are three-ply 100 percent cotton, with elastic over-ear straps.

There is a catch here. As hospitals have known long before us, it’s pretty difficult to get something — even something as simply designed as a reusable cloth mask — into production very quickly, especially when we’re in the midst of a pandemic. So even Old Navy’s factories aren’t able to get us instant gratification here. These masks have only been available for pre-order since 5 a.m. ET Friday, are selling so fast that they the estimated shipping date is May 27 as of this writing. Get your orders in soon!

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you’ll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale and the retailer may receive certain auditable data for accounting purposes. 

Still mask shopping? Most of these kids masks are available right now.






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Jenna Dewan Praises New Dad Steve Kazee After Welcoming Son Callum

Head over heels! Jenna Dewan is smitten with watching her fiancé, Steve Kazee, embrace fatherhood for the first time with their 2-month-old son, Callum.

The Flirty Dancing host, 39, shared a sweet picture via Instagram on Thursday, May 7, of Kazee, 44, and their son taking a nap together.

“Seeing you become a father is one of the greatest things I’ve ever witnessed,” Dewan captioned the photo. “The depth of emotion you feel, the love you share, the insane ability you have to do it ALL for all of us .. we are so lucky.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_5hzQ9De1Y/

Seeing you become a father is one of the greatest things I’ve ever witnessed. The depth of emotion you feel, the love you share, the insane ability you have to do it ALL for all of us..we are so lucky ❤️

A post shared byJenna Dewan (@jennadewan) on

The former World of Dance host gave birth to Callum in March — just one month after the couple got engaged at Dewan’s baby shower.

“And just like that, our hearts exploded into all of eternity and beyond,” Dewan wrote via Instagram at the time. “Welcome to the world you little angel! 3/6/20.”

One day later, Kazee explained how he and the former backup dancer settled on the name Callum for their son.

“We’ve had lots of questions about the name we choose for the little peanut so figured I would share a few things,” the Once star wrote via Instagram at the time. “Callum: Gaelic for Dove because he has been so sweet and peaceful since landing in our arms. Michael: My middle name. Rebel: I wanted a way to honor my mother. Her name was Reba but from a very young age, her father called her Rebel. And so … Callum Michael Rebel Kazee was born.”

Us Weekly confirmed in October 2018 that Dewan and the Kentucky native were dating six months after she and her ex-husband, Channing Tatum, split. The former couple — who were married from 2009 to 2018 — share 6-year-old daughter, Everly.

Dewan and Kazee announced their engagement in February via Instagram. The Tamara star shared a picture of the duo kissing captioned, “A lifetime to love and grow with you…you have my heart.”

Kazee, meanwhile, wrote at the time, “When you wake in the morning I will kiss your face with a smile no one has ever seen. When you wake in the morning I will kiss your eyes and say it’s you I have loved all these years.”

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