Sperm don’t swim anything like we thought they did, new study finds

Under a microscope, human sperm seem to swim like wiggling eels, tails gyrating to and fro as they seek an egg to fertilize. 

But now, new 3D microscopy and high-speed video reveal that sperm don’t swim in this simple, symmetrical motion at all. Instead, they move with a rollicking spin that compensates for the fact that their tails actually beat only to one side. 

“It’s almost like if you’re a swimmer, but you could only wiggle your leg to one side,” said study author Hermes Gadêlha, a mathematician at the University of Bristol in the U.K. “If you did this in a swimming pool and you only did this to one side, you would always swim in circles. … Nature in its wisdom came [up] with a very complex, ingenious way to go forward.” 

Strange swimmers

The first person to observe human sperm close up was Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, a Dutch scientist known as the father of microbiology. In 1677, van Leeuwenhoek turned his newly developed microscope toward his own semen, seeing for the first time that the fluid was filled with tiny, wiggling cells. 

Under a 2D microscope, it was clear that the sperm were propelled by tails, which seemed to wiggle side-to-side as the sperm head rotated. For the next 343 years, this was the understanding of how human sperm moved. 

“[M]any scientists have postulated that there is likely to be a very important 3D element to how the sperm tail moves, but to date we have not had the technology to reliably make such measurements,” said Allan Pacey, a professor of andrology at the University of Sheffield in England, who was not involved in the research. 

The new research is thus a “significant step forward,” Pacey wrote in an email to Live Science. 

Gadêlha and his colleagues at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México started the research out of “blue-sky exploration,” Gadêlha said. Using microscopy techniques that allow for imaging in three dimensions and a high-speed camera that can capture 55,000 frames per second, they recorded human sperm swimming on a microscope slide. 

“What we found was something utterly surprising, because it completely broke with our belief system,” Gadêlha told Live Science. 

The sperm tails weren’t wiggling, whip-like, side-to-side. Instead, they could only beat in one direction. In order to wring forward motion out of this asymmetrical tail movement, the sperm head rotated with a jittery motion at the same time that the tail rotated.The head rotation and the tail are actually two separate movements controlled by two different cellular mechanisms, Gadêlha said. But when they combine, the result is something like a spinning otter or a rotating drill bit. Over the course of a 360-degree rotation, the one-side tail movement evens out, adding up to forward propulsion.

“The sperm is not even swimming, the sperm is drilling into the fluid,” Gadêlha said. 

The researchers published their findings today (July 31) in the journal Science Advances.

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Asymmetry and fertility

In technical terms, how the sperm moves is called precession, meaning it rotates around an axis, but that axis of rotation is changing. The planets do this in their rotational journeys around the sun, but a more familiar example might be a spinning top, which wobbles and dances about the floor as it rotates on its tip. 

“It’s important to note that on their journey to the egg that sperm will swim through a much more complex environment than the drop of fluid in which they were observed for this study,” Pacey said. “In the woman’s body, they will have to swim in narrow channels of very sticky fluid in the cervix, walls of undulating cells in the fallopian tubes, as well have to cope with muscular contractions and fluid being pushed along (by the wafting tops of cells called cilia) in the opposite direction to where they want to go. However, if they are indeed able to drill their way forward, I can now see in much better clarity how sperm might cope with this assault course in order to reach the egg and be able to get inside it,” Pacey said

Sperm motility, or ability to move, is one of the key metrics fertility doctors look at when assessing male fertility, Gadêlha said. The rolling of the sperm’s head isn’t currently considered in any of these metrics, but it’s possible that further study could reveal certain defects that disrupt this rotation, and thus stymy the sperm’s movement. 

Fertility clinics use 2D microscopy, and more work is needed to find out if 3D microscopy could benefit their analysis, Pacey said. 

“Certainly, any 3D approach would have to be quick, cheap and automated to have any clinical value,” he said. “But regardless of this, this paper is certainly a step in the right direction.”

Originally published in Live Science.

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Excessive drinking responsible for 255 deaths per day in U.S.

(HealthDay)—Excessive drinking was responsible for an average of 255 deaths per day in the United States during 2011 to 2015, according to research published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Marissa B. Esser, Ph.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues estimated national and state average annual alcohol-attributable deaths and years of potential life lost (YPLL) during 2011 to 2015, including deaths from one’s own excessive drinking and from others’ drinking.

An average of 93,296 alcohol-attributable deaths (255 per day) and 2.7 million YPLL (29 years of life lost per death, on average) were identified in the United States each year. The researchers found that 54.7 percent of all alcohol-attributable deaths were caused by chronic conditions and 56.0 percent involved adults aged 35 to 64 years. Per 100,000 population, age-adjusted alcohol-attributable deaths ranged from 20.3 in New Jersey and New York to 52.3 in New Mexico. Per 100,000 population, YPLL varied from 613.8 in New York to 1,651.7 in New Mexico.

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Pseudoislet system expected to advance pancreas and diabetes research

The multicellular, 3-D structure of human pancreatic islets—the areas of the pancreas containing hormone-producing or endocrine cells—has presented challenges to researchers as they study and manipulate these cells’ function, but Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have now developed a pseudoislet system that allows for much easier study of islet function.

A pancreatic islet is composed primarily of beta cells, alpha cells and delta cells, but also includes many supporting cells, such as endothelial cells, nerve fibers and immune cells, which act in concert as a mini organ to control blood glucose through hormone secretion. Insulin, secreted from beta islet cells, lowers blood glucose by stimulating glucose uptake in peripheral tissues, while glucagon, secreted from alpha islet cells, raises blood glucose through its actions in the liver.

Dysfunction of these islet cells is a primary component of all forms of diabetes, and a better understanding of this dysfunction can lead to improved treatment and management of the disease. Vanderbilt scientists and others around the world have identified potential targets for diabetes using both mouse models and human tissue, however the lack of a system to manipulate these pathways in human islet cells has limited the field.

The VUMC team led by Marcela Brissova, Ph.D., research professor of Medicine and director of the Islet Procurement and Analysis Core of the Diabetes Research and Training Center, began attempting a protocol for the pseudoislet system in 2016, performing countless trials. In late 2017, Rachana Haliyur, then a Vanderbilt MD/Ph.D. student, combined media containing factors that support vascular cells and endocrine cells into what the group named the Vanderbilt Pseudoislet Media. The team watched as the cells began reaggregating, or organizing themselves in a way that resembled native islets.

“A lot of things in science happen serendipitously, and this was one of those,” said Brissova. “We tried and failed many times, and basically it came down to the media we used for our cells. In our recent publication, we have provided all experimental details and our protocol so others can make the media and create pseudoislets in their own laboratories.”

Because of the complex structure of the human islet, it is difficult to introduce and manipulate cells past the first cell-layer of the islet sphere. The pseudoislet system allows investigators to separate the pancreatic islet into single cells, introduce a virus into the cells which allows genetic manipulation and then combine the cells back together again into a pseudoislet. This allows researchers to target certain cell types or replicate changes happening in disease and study them in the 3-D environment of the islet.

John “Jack” Walker, an MD/Ph.D. student in the Powers & Brissova Research Group, continued to refine the pseudoislet system protocol and was co-first author on a recent study based on the system published in JCI Insight, an open access journal published by the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI).

The pseudoislet system allowed the VUMC investigators to more clearly examine intracellular signaling pathways, allowing genetic manipulation of those pathways to change their function and better understand how insulin and glucagon secretion are altered with that manipulation. They determined that activation of Gi protein signaling reduced insulin and glucagon secretion while activation of Gq protein signaling stimulated glucagon secretion but had both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on insulin secretion.

In addition, this approach allowed the scientists to introduce biosensors into the islet cells to measure intercellular signaling events within the cells and better understand how those are linked to hormone secretion.

Another advance was the combination of the pseudoislet system with a unique microfluidic device, developed by co-authors Matthew Ishahak and Ashutosh Agarwal, Ph.D., from the University of Miami, that allowed the investigators to simultaneously document the changes in both calcium ions and hormone secretion.

“The exciting thing about this approach is that we both deconstruct the islet for our manipulation and reconstruct it to understand functional consequences at a larger level,” Walker said. “Since we put the islet cells back together, we can look at both insulin and glucagon secretion, but in a coordinated manner. Both of the secretion profiles measured are reflective of intra-islet interactions that are happening as well.”

This work greatly benefited from the research environment and infrastructure at Vanderbilt, particularly the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Diabetes Research and Training Center (DRTC) and the Vanderbilt Cell Imaging Shared Resource.

“Another research direction will be creating pseudoislets that replicate a specific disease state, such as pseudo-islets that look like native islets from an individual with type 1 diabetes,” Haliyur said.

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Experts make weak recommendation for remdesivir in severe COVID-19

In The BMJ today, a panel of international experts make a weak recommendation for the use of remdesivir in patients with severe covid-19, and strongly support continued enrolment of patients into ongoing clinical trials of remdesivir.

Their advice is part of The BMJ‘s Rapid Recommendations initiative—to produce rapid and trustworthy guidelines for clinical practice based on new evidence to help doctors make better decisions with their patients.

The antiviral medication remdesivir has received worldwide attention as a potentially effective treatment for severe covid-19 and is already being used in clinical practice.

Today’s recommendation is based on a new evidence review comparing the effects of several drug treatments for covid-19 up to 20 July 2020.

It shows that remdesivir may be effective in reducing recovery time in patients with severe covid-19, although the certainty of the evidence is low. But remdesivir probably has no important effect on the need for mechanical ventilation and may have little or no effect on length of hospital stay.

The authors stress that “the effectiveness of most interventions is uncertain because most of the randomised controlled trials so far have been small and have important study limitations.”

After thoroughly reviewing this evidence, the expert panel says that most patients with severe covid-19 would likely choose treatment with remdesivir given the potential reduction in time to clinical improvement.

But given the low certainty evidence, and allowing for different patient perspectives, values, and preferences, they issued a weak recommendation with strong support for continued recruitment in trials.

They suggest that future research should focus on areas such as optimal dose and duration of therapy, and whether there are specific groups of patients most likely to benefit from remdesivir.

The authors also sound a note of caution about the potential opportunity cost of using remdesivir while the evidence base is still uncertain. As a relatively costly drug that is given intravenously, use of remdesivir may divert funds, time, attention, and workforce away from other potentially worthwhile treatments.

The study that today’s recommendation is based on is called a living systematic review.

In a linked editorial, The BMJ editors explain that living systematic reviews are useful in fast moving research areas such as covid-19 because they allow authors to update previously vetted and peer reviewed evidence summaries as new information becomes available.

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Bump Up the Jam! These Celebs Showed Off Their Baby Bumps in Music Videos


Moms really can do it all.

On Thursday, a pregnant Nicki Minaj posted a video on Instagram where she is seen effortlessly rapping along to her latest single, "Move Ya Hips," her just-released collaboration with A$AP Ferg and MadeinTYO. Minaj announced on July 20 that she and husband Kenneth Petty are expecting their first child together, alongside a set of glam snapshots baring her baby bump.

Because celebrity moms are no strangers to putting in work while — no big deal — nurturing and growing another human life, here are nine other singers and performers who gave multi-tasking a new meaning and showed off their baby bumps while showing off their skills.

Katy Perry

The singer revealed that she is expecting her first child with fiancé Orlando Bloom when she debuted her growing baby bump in the music video for her song "Never Worn White."

Carrie Underwood

In 2018 the country music singer revealed her baby bump in the music video for "Love Wins," showing it off in a flowing orange dress while singing in an open field. The star had just announced that she was expecting her second child with husband Mike Fisher.

P!nk

The singer, who was expecting her daughter Willow at the time, cradled her baby bump in the music video for "Perfect," which made the already emotional song even more heartfelt.

Solange

We love a supportive big sister! Beyoncé made sure to include her sister Solange, then pregnant with son Julez, in the music video for "Soldier," when the group sang the lyric "known to carry big things if ya know what I mean."

Beyoncé

After revealing that she was pregnant while performing at the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards, Beyoncé included her bump in the music video for "Countdown," pointing to her stomach while singing "I'm tryna make us three from that two." The singer gave birth to her first child with husband Jay-Z, baby girl Blue Ivy Carter, on Jan. 7, 2012.

Cardi B

The rapper revealed that she was expecting her first child with her husband, Migos rapper Offset, while performing live on Saturday Night Live in 2018. The couple welcomed their daughter, Kulture Kiari in July of that year.

Jessie James Decker

The country music star released the video for her song “Flip My Hair” in January 2018, in which she performed an impressive dance routine – while six months pregnant with her third child!

Natalie Portman

In 2017, a very pregnant Natalie Portman starred in the music video for James Blake's "My Willing Heart." And when we say "very pregnant," we mean literally days away from giving birth to her daughter Amalia.

Teyana Taylor

Teyana Taylor revealed the happy news that she is expecting her second child with a music video for her song "Wake Up Love." In the closing scene of the video, Taylor shares a kiss in bed with her 4-year-old daughter Iman Tayla (a.k.a. Junie) and NBA pro husband, Iman Shumpert, before pulling down her blanket and lifting up her shirt to reveal her baby bump for the first time.

One thing's for sure: These famous kiddos will have some pretty cool stories to tell!

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Transcranial stimulation to prevent fear memories from returning

A research group from the University of Bologna has succeeded in modifying the negative effect of a returning memory that triggers fear, and developed a new non-invasive experimental protocol. The result of this study, published in the journal Current Biology, is an innovative protocol that combines fear conditioning—a stimulus associated with something unpleasant that induces a negative memory—and the neurostimulation of a specific site of the prefrontal cortex.

This process alters the perception of an unpleasant (aversive) event so that it will no longer induce fear. “This experimental protocol combining transcranial stimulation and memory reconsolidation allowed us to modify an aversive memory that the participants had learned the day before,” explains Sara Borgomaneri, a researcher at the University of Bologna and first author of the study. “This result has relevant repercussions for understanding how memory works. It might even lead to the development of new therapies to deal with traumatic memories.”

Can memories be altered?

The primary focus of the research group is the process of reconsolidation. This process maintains, strengthens and alters those events that are already stored in long-term memory. “Every time an event is recalled in our memory, there is a limited period of time in which it can be altered,” explains Simone Battaglia, researcher and co-author of this study. “The protocol we developed exploits this short time window and can, therefore, interfere with the reconsolidation process of learned aversive memories.”

Researchers used TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) to “erase” the fear induced by a negative memory. With an electromagnetic coil placed on the head of the participant, TMS creates magnetic fields that can alter the neural activity of specific brain areas. TMS is a non-invasive procedure that does not require surgery or any action on the participant and for this reason, is widespread in research as well as in clinic and rehabilitation programs.

“With TMS, we could alter the functioning of the prefrontal cortex, which proved to be fundamental in the reconsolidation process of aversive memories,” says Sara Borgomaneri. “Thanks to this procedure, we obtained results that, until now, were only possible by delivering drugs to patients.”

The trial

The research group developed this protocol through a trial involving 98 healthy people. Every participant had learned an aversive memory and the next day underwent a TMS session over the prefrontal cortex.

“First, we created the aversive memory by combining an unpleasant stimulation with some images,” explains Borgomaneri. “The day after, we presented a group of participants with the same stimulus, which, in their memory, was recorded as aversive. Using TMS immediately afterwards, we interfered with their prefrontal cortex activity.”

To test the effectiveness of the protocol, other groups of participants underwent TMS without their aversive memory to be recalled (no reconsolidation was triggered), and some other groups were stimulated with TMS in control brain areas, not involved in memory reconsolidation.

At that point, the only thing left to do for researchers was to evaluate the effectiveness of TMS. They waited for another day and once again tested how the participants reacted when the aversive memory was recalled. And they obtained encouraging results. Participants who had their prefrontal cortex activity inhibited by TMS showed a reduced psychophysiological response to the unpleasant stimulus. They remembered the event (explicit memory) but its negative effect was substantially reduced.

“This trial showed that it is feasible to alter the persistence of potentially traumatic memories. This may have crucial repercussions in the fields of rehabilitation and clinical medicine,” says Professor Giuseppe di Pellegrino, who coordinated the study. “We’re dealing with a new technique that can be employed in different contexts and can assume a variety of functions, starting from treating PTSD, which will be the focus of our next study.”

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Georgia News Anchor Becomes First Person to Receive COVID-19 Vaccine Shot in Phase 3 Trial



Dawn said that her injection was "painless" and she was not informed whether she was given the placebo or the vaccine.

Earlier this week, Dr. Anthony Fauci shared that this prospective vaccine is being developed at a speed like never before.

It's "the fastest from the time a virus, a pathogen, was identified to the time it actually goes into a Phase 3 trial, literally in the history of vaccinology in the United States at least, and maybe even throughout the world," he explained during an NIH event on Facebook Live on Monday.

In mid-July, early test results from Phase 1 of the trial reflected potential success, with Fauci calling the trial "very good news."

According to the National Institutes of Health, the vaccine, mRNA-1273, was "generally well tolerated and prompted neutralizing antibody activity in healthy adults."

The vaccine is "designed to induce neutralizing antibodies directed at a portion of the coronavirus 'spike' protein, which the virus uses to bind to and enter human cells," according to a press release.

Phase 2 of the trials began in May, with the third round set to continue into the fall. "We’re going to start the Phase 3 trial in the third or fourth week of July. That is going to take place over the rest of the summer and into the fall. If all goes well and there aren’t any unanticipated bumps in the road, hopefully, we should know whether the vaccine is safe and effective by the end of this calendar year, or the beginning of 2021," Fauci told InStyle.

As of July 30, there have been more than 4.4 million cases of the coronavirus and at least 151,194 deaths, according to recent data from the New York Times.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments. PEOPLE has partnered with GoFundMe to raise money for the COVID-19 Relief Fund, a GoFundMe.org fundraiser to support everything from frontline responders to families in need, as well as organizations helping communities. For more information or to donate, click here.

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New motion capture screening technology could slow progression of arthritis

Most people don’t think about their thumbs very often. But for people living with advancing arthritis, the simplest thumb movements—from grasping a cup to sending a text message—can be painful and incredibly challenging.

That’s why Michigan State University researchers set out to see if they could use motion capture technology to screen for differences between healthy hand movements and those in patients with osteoarthritis, or OA. This method could potentially detect arthritis earlier, possibly delaying and preventing the loss of thumb function. In turn, that could save arthritis patients from surgery and even being forced into assisted living.

The team’s research is published in Clinical Biomechanics.

“Our work suggests that three-dimensional motion tasks may be able to identify OA-associated motion deficits earlier than the two-dimensional motion tasks typically used in a clinical setting,” said Amber Vocelle, co-author on the research and a DO/Ph.D. student in the College of Osteopathic Medicine. “By identifying the disease earlier, we can treat OA earlier in the disease process.”

According to Vocelle, therapists and clinicians traditionally use goniometers, simple two-dimensional measurement tools, along with basic movements to screen for reduced hand function due to OA. But the results can vary depending on who’s doing the measuring, making it hard to track reliably over time.

“There are pieces of information that aren’t being gathered right now that could be useful for early prediction of OA of the thumb, or setting up thresholds to define when people should consider doing therapy before they’re in severe pain,” said Tamara Reid Bush, an associate professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering who also worked on the research.

In contrast, motion capture technology records precise, objective measurements in three dimensions.

Both Bush and Vocelle, along with Gail Shafer, an assistant professor in the College of Human Medicine, put markers on participants’ hands, which were then monitored by motion capture technology as they went through a series of three-dimensional thumb movements. Differences between healthy and OA-diagnosed patients were observed.

The thumb isn’t usually looked at in isolation with reference to OA, but this research may be changing that.

“Thumbs aren’t just important for people playing the piano or knitting for fun. Almost everything you do on a daily basis involves the thumb in some way, shape or form,” Bush added.

Forthcoming research from the trio will look at how a six-week thumb exercise protocol impacted the ability to generate forces with the thumb. The researchers observed an increase in thumb strength in just two weeks.

So where could this go next? One avenue would be to develop tools for conducting these three-dimensional measurements in-clinic without the need for laboratory-grade motion capture devices. That would give therapists the ability to not only evaluate more complex movement patterns for earlier diagnosis, but also measure the impact of treatment for better outcomes.

This type of collaboration between research specialties can be difficult to pull off, but Vocelle’s rotations as part of her DO/Ph.D. program presented a meaningful opportunity for integration. The three combined Vocelle’s clinical knowledge, Shafer’s rehabilitation expertise, and Bush’s deep understanding of biomechanics to offer a fresh perspective on a long-standing clinical problem.

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Diet: These meals are ideal in the heat, Naturopathy, naturopathic specialist portal

What is best in the heat to eat

Although there seems to be this summer, no heat wave, as in previous years, but in some places, the temperatures are rising on some days to almost 40 degrees. The heat makes many people to create. The right diet can help to endure the hot weather better.

In the next few days, especially in the South-West of the country, tropical temperatures are to be achieved. Most important of all, to get fit due to the heat wave, the daily, adequate fluid intake (unsweetened) drinks. However, the right diet can help to survive the hot days better.

Enough to drink

The summer heat added to the cycle, you will feel quickly tired and listless. At high temperatures, the human body, helps first automatically: The blood vessels of the skin expand and can dissipate more heat to the outside, explained the German society for Internal intensive care and emergency medicine (DGIIN) in a message.

At the same time, begins to sweat, what with the cooling of the evaporative cooling even more efficient. With the sweat fluid and important minerals are lost. These losses have to be overcome: While the usual Drink is about 1.5 liters a day, it should be in heat at least twice as much.

The ideal beverage to quench your thirst of water, juice spritzers or tea; Soups and isotonic drinks can help the loss of Salt to compensate. Also by eating the right foods can help to cope better with high temperatures.

The body is not burdened by wrong food

“Fat-rich food, or large portions lie at this time of year particularly hard in the stomach and are an additional burden for the body,” explains Silke Raffeiner, nutrition expert of the consumer advice centre of South Tyrol, in a recent post.

“Easier to tolerate than a” Wiener Schnitzel ” with French fries or a full three-course menu of fresh vegetables and fruit and carefully prepared vegetarian food.”

By regular meals, even on vacation, this hot prevents hunger attacks and that, in consequence of too much is eaten. Raw vegetables and fruits refresh with a high water content such as cucumbers, tomatoes and watermelon provide the body with vitamins, minerals, protective phytochemicals, and liquid.

Vegetables can also dampen or in a little water to gently cook. Fruit salad, a yogurt with fresh fruit or a mixed fruit-butter-milk-drink as a snack or as a wholesome Dessert suitable. And overripe bananas are perfect for a homemade Sorbet without added sugar.

Vegetarian food prefer

Easy cold main meals, such as, for example, a Couscous salad or a pasta salad with lots of vegetables, fresh herbs and to taste cheese (such as Mozzarella or Feta). Especially in southern countries, cold soups like the Spanish “Gazpacho” made of cucumbers, tomatoes and peppers are popular.

Because proteins stimulate the body’s own heat production, it is recommended to heat in General, to prefer vegetarian food on the Grill. Particularly good for this tasty form of Preparation Zucchini, peppers, eggplant and corn are piston.

Instead of sausage or cheese on the bread, Hummus (chickpea puree), or other spread made from healthy sleeve tastes for a change fruits. (ad)

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Fauci suggests goggles, eye shield for better protection against coronavirus

Dr. Fauci says he’s ‘cautiously optimistic’ about COVID vaccine trials, guarantees no corners are being cut

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, joins John Roberts with insight on ‘Special Report.’

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, this week said wearing goggles or an eye shield in addition to a face mask would provide more complete protection against the coronavirus, according to a report.

“Theoretically you should protect all of the mucosal surfaces [eyes, nose, mouth], so if you have goggles or an eye shield, you should use it,” he said in an interview with ABC News on Instagram Wednesday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention already recommends wearing a face mask that covers the nose and mouth in public but the virus can also enter through the eyes.

Fauci recommended goggles in addition to a face mask for those who want “perfect protection” from the COVID-19 but admitted it’s not “universally recommended.”

He added one of the reasons eyewear hasn’t been recommended yet is “it’s so easy for people to just make a cloth mask.”

Heading into fall, Fauci said he encourages people to get a flu vaccine and hopes face masks will protect people from the flu as well as the coronavirus, ABC reported.

Not everyone responded favorably on social media to the idea of adding eyewear to facemasks. Some remarked the next step would be hazmat suits or living inside of a bubble, according to Market Watch. 

The United States is still outpacing every other country in the number of cases with more than 4.3 million and upwards of 150,000 deaths.

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