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How often should you clean your hairbrush? The gruesome impact it may have on your scalp

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Your hairbrush may be one of the most used tools in your beauty artillery. Yet, while washing makeup brushes is a common affair, many people don’t realise the importance of giving their hairbrush a routine scrub too.

Cleaning your hairbrush goes far beyond simply removing the loose hair tangled between the bristles.

According to hair experts from WeThrift, hairbrushes should also be regularly washed and sanitised.

This is because each bristle can house a buildup of bacteria and dirt – none of which will do your hair or scalp any favours.

Furthermore, cleaning your hairbrush regularly is said to “improve” the overall “performance” of the styling tool.

But what harm can an unwashed hairbrush pose to your head?

According to the experts from WeThrift, cleaning your hairbrush more frequently will get rid of dirt, product buildup and oils from the scalp that sit on the brush bristles over time.

This buildup can lead to some gruesome developments if it does manage to come into contact with your head.

A spokesperson said: “Using a dirty hairbrush allows germs and fungi to infect your scalp, produce head acne, dandruff, scalp folliculitis and other scalp disorders.”

The transfer of bacteria to your hair can also impact its appearance over time.

WeThrift’s spokesperson said: “Skipping regular cleaning also leads to germs and bacteria being passed onto your hair and scalp from the residue on the brush.

“This can leave your hair looking not only greasy but makes detangling that much harder too.

“After all, the last thing you want is all that dirt and deposits back onto your freshly washed hair.”

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How often should I clean my hairbrush?

According to the experts, the key to ensuring your hair stays fresh and does to get weighed down with residue is to clean your hairbrush “once every two weeks”.

However, if you use more styling products or dry shampoo, your hairbrush may require a clean on a weekly basis.

How do I properly clean my hairbrush?

The WeThrift expert said: “Cleaning your hair tools doesn’t have to be a complex, messy or time-consuming task.

“You don’t need to buy an expensive hairbrush cleanser, as shampoo works really well at removing any dirt and breaking down oil.”

Whether your brush is made from wood or plastic, the same cleaning method applies.

  1. Start by using the end of a comb with a pointed end to remove the hair from the brush. If you don’t have a comb, you can use any pointed object, such as a pen, pencil or skewer.
  2. Next, you’ll need to fill up the sink or a bowl with warm water and a small amount of shampoo. Soak the hairbrush for about five minutes before thoroughly washing, in order to break down product and dirt build-up.
  3. Don’t fully submerge a wooden brush in water, as this could cause damage to the material and finish. Instead, place the bristles face down in the water.
  4. Then, grab an old but clean toothbrush and gently brush it against the bristles until it’s nice and soapy. Ensure you are gentle while doing this as certain bristles can break, especially around water.
  5. Once you’ve finished cleaning, rinse the hairbrush under running water. You should ensure that the brush has no excess shampoo, therefore it is best to keep rinsing until the water runs clear.
  6. Give the hairbrush a good shake and leave to dry, facing down on a towel or cloth overnight to gather excess water.

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